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Dr. Assil Saleh of Foxhall Internists in D.C. says smoking has been linked to cardiovascular disease and an increased risk of cancer. While most smokers know they should quit, many find it easier said than done. Dr. Warren Levy, president and chief medical officer of Virginia Heart in Fairfax, Va., says it often takes a big medical scare for smokers to get the message. He says the key to quitting is getting support from others. (ThinkStock)

Dr. Assil Saleh of Foxhall Internists in D.C. says smoking has been linked to cardiovascular disease and an increased risk of cancer. While most smokers know they should quit, many find it easier said than done.

Dr. Warren Levy, president and chief medical officer of Virginia Heart in Fairfax, Va., says it often takes a big medical scare for smokers to get the message. He says the key to quitting is getting support from others.

(ThinkStock)
Its the number one recommendation of Dr. Will Kimbrough, an internist with One Medical Group in D.C. He advises two to four hours of moderate exercise a week, and he urges patients to mix weight training with cardiovascular exercises such as running, swimming or biking. Dr. Kimbrough says exercising at young age has big health benefits when people get older. (ThinkStock)

It's the number one recommendation of Dr. Will Kimbrough, an internist with One Medical Group in D.C. He advises two to four hours of moderate exercise a week, and he urges patients to mix weight training with cardiovascular exercises such as running, swimming or biking. Dr. Kimbrough says exercising at young age has big health benefits when people get older.

(ThinkStock)
Dr. Howard Brooks with Skin Cosmetic Dermatology in Georgetown says sunscreen is a must in the heat of summer and the chill of winter. He says even on days when it is snowing or cloudy, you can still get the harmful rays that can cause skin cancer and premature aging. He recommends applying SPF 30 daily and notes many moisturizers and body lotions contain sun protection. Left Former U.S. President Bill Clinton applies sunscreen at the Milton Academy Commencement ceremonies June 6, 2003 in Milton, Massachusetts. (Photo by Douglas McFaddGetty Images)

Dr. Howard Brooks with Skin Cosmetic Dermatology in Georgetown says sunscreen is a must in the heat of summer and the chill of winter. He says even on days when it is snowing or cloudy, "you can still get the harmful rays that can cause skin cancer and premature aging." He recommends applying SPF 30 daily and notes many moisturizers and body lotions contain sun protection.

Left: Former U.S. President Bill Clinton applies sunscreen at the Milton Academy Commencement ceremonies June 6, 2003 in Milton, Massachusetts. (Photo by Douglas McFadd/Getty Images)
This is another one of those year-round must-dos. Many people dont drink enough water in winter and often dont think they need a lot since they arent sweating as much. But Dr. Kimbrough says we actually lose a lot of fluid when we breathe, and the dry air in winter has an effect. He says its a good idea to keep a bottle or glass of water handy and sip on it throughout the day. (ThinkStock)

This is another one of those year-round must-dos. Many people don't drink enough water in winter and often don't think they need a lot since they aren't sweating as much. But Dr. Kimbrough says we actually lose a lot of fluid when we breathe, and the dry air in winter has an effect. He says it's a good idea to keep a bottle or glass of water handy and sip on it throughout the day.

(ThinkStock)
Cardiologist Warren Levy says everyone should know their cholesterol levels -- including the HDL (good cholesterol) and LDL (bad cholesterol). He says its also important to know your blood pressure, blood glucose and weight. Dr. Angela Marshall with Comprehensive Womens Health in Silver Spring and Bowie, Md., says this is vital information that can help patients become advocates for their own health. (ThinkStock)

Cardiologist Warren Levy says everyone should know their cholesterol levels -- including the HDL (good cholesterol) and LDL (bad cholesterol). He says it's also important to know your blood pressure, blood glucose and weight.

Dr. Angela Marshall with Comprehensive Women's Health in Silver Spring and Bowie, Md., says this is vital information that can help patients become advocates for their own health.

(ThinkStock)
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Forget crash diets. Make a series of eating adjustments instead and let them build over time. Focus on gradually cutting back on salt and sugar and adding more vegetables to your meals. Dr. Kimbrough says try to eat vegetarian one or two days a week and avoid processed food. He says if you cant pronounce an ingredient, maybe you should eat something else. Left Dr. Will Kimbrough prepares a meal in his kitchen. (Courtesy of Will Kimbrough)

Forget crash diets. Make a series of eating adjustments instead and let them build over time. Focus on gradually cutting back on salt and sugar and adding more vegetables to your meals. Dr. Kimbrough says try to eat vegetarian one or two days a week and avoid processed food. He says if you can't pronounce an ingredient, maybe you should eat something else.

Left: Dr. Will Kimbrough prepares a meal in his kitchen. (Courtesy of Will Kimbrough)
Dr. Barry DiCicco with the Northern Virginia Sleep Center in Fairfax, Va. says most adults need seven to eight hours of sleep a night. Most people make sleep a low priority on their to-do list, he says. He adds that sleep deprivation increases the risk of heart attack, stroke, high blood pressure and diabetes, so be mindful of your sleep hygiene. Dr. DiCicco recommends getting into a routine and unplug. Do something to take your mind of work and turn off, or turn away from, smartphones and computers an hour before bed. The light from these digital devices can suppress the release of the sleep-promoting hormone melatonin. (ThinkStock)

Dr. Barry DiCicco with the Northern Virginia Sleep Center in Fairfax, Va. says most adults need seven to eight hours of sleep a night. Most people make sleep "a low priority on their to-do list," he says. He adds that sleep deprivation increases the risk of heart attack, stroke, high blood pressure and diabetes, so be mindful of your "sleep hygiene."

Dr. DiCicco recommends getting into a routine and unplug. Do something to take your mind of work and turn off, or turn away from, smartphones and computers an hour before bed. The light from these digital devices can suppress the release of the sleep-promoting hormone melatonin.

(ThinkStock)
The mouth is the gateway to the body, and dentists can pick up on warning signs a physician may not see. Dentist Harres Rahim with Bloo Dental in Ashburn, Va. says they look for far more than just cavities. He says a dental check-up can turn up early indications of cardiovascular disease, diabetes and even HIV. Dentists are also usually the first to detect signs of oral cancer, which is more common in the United States than leukemia. (ThinkStock)

The mouth is the gateway to the body, and dentists can pick up on warning signs a physician may not see. Dentist Harres Rahim with Bloo Dental in Ashburn, Va. says they look for far more than just cavities. He says a dental check-up can turn up early indications of cardiovascular disease, diabetes and even HIV. Dentists are also usually the first to detect signs of oral cancer, which is more common in the United States than leukemia.

(ThinkStock)
Psychologist Gregory Jones with District Psychotherapy in D.C. says stress can have a huge impact on your health. His prescription for managing all that pressure is to start with the basics sleep, social life, healthy eating and self care. He says strong friendships can be a big help, and notes increased socialization has been found to minimize symptoms of depression, dementia and memory loss. (ThinkStock)

Psychologist Gregory Jones with District Psychotherapy in D.C. says stress can have a huge impact on your health. His prescription for managing all that pressure is to start with the basics: "sleep, social life, healthy eating and self care." He says strong friendships can be a big help, and notes increased socialization has been found to minimize symptoms of depression, dementia and memory loss.

(ThinkStock)
Doctors say it is the ultimate in preventative care. Dr. Angela Marshall says think of it like getting a tune-up for your car. You dont wait until the car breaks, you take it in for regular maintenance, she says. An annual physical gives you the ability to monitor trends, like an uptick over the years in cholesterol or blood glucose. With an annual check-up, Marshall says you can keep small problems from getting out of hand. (ThinkStock)

Doctors say it is the ultimate in preventative care. Dr. Angela Marshall says think of it like getting a tune-up for your car. "You don't wait until the car breaks, you take it in for regular maintenance," she says. An annual physical gives you the ability to monitor trends, like an uptick over the years in cholesterol or blood glucose. With an annual check-up, Marshall says you can keep small problems from getting out of hand.

(ThinkStock)
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