AUTOPLAY 

8th August 1974 American president Richard Nixon (1913 - 1994) announces his resignation on national television, following the Watergate scandal. (Photo by Pierre ManevyExpressGetty Images)
8th August 1974: American president Richard Nixon (1913 - 1994) announces his resignation on national television, following the Watergate scandal. (Photo by Pierre Manevy/Express/Getty Images)
Former President Richard Nixons resignation speech.
Former President Richard Nixon's resignation speech.
Watergate tapes President Richard Nixon and his aide Charles W. Colson discuss the administrations relations with the Washington Post as the Watergate investigation proceeded.
Watergate tapes: President Richard Nixon and his aide Charles W. Colson discuss the administration's relations with the Washington Post as the Watergate investigation proceeded.
President Richard Nixon gives his famous I am not a crook speech on Nov. 17, 1973.
President Richard Nixon gives his famous "I am not a crook" speech on Nov. 17, 1973.
11th May 1973 American politician and former attorney-general John Mitchell, one of Richard Nixons top aides, is sworn in at the Senate. He is facing charges in connection with the Watergate scandal. His wife Martha Mitchell is second from right. American President Richard Nixon is on the left. (Photo by KeystoneGetty Images)
11th May 1973: American politician and former attorney-general John Mitchell, one of Richard Nixon's top aides, is sworn in at the Senate. He is facing charges in connection with the Watergate scandal. His wife Martha Mitchell is second from right. American President Richard Nixon is on the left. (Photo by Keystone/Getty Images)
bnv.wtop.photogalleries/history;history=main;tile=3;pos=mid1;sz=300x250;ord=
In this June 10, 1983 frame grab of video made available by Raiford Communications, Inc., former president Richard Nixon talks about his 1974 resignation in a series of interviews conducted by former White House aide Frank Gannon in New York City. The Richard Nixon Presidential Library and the privately held Nixon Foundation are co-releasing a trove of videotaped interviews with the former president to mark the 40th anniversary of his resignation following the Watergate scandal. The 28 minutes of tape, detailing Nixons personal turmoil in his final week in office, were culled from more than 30 hours of tape recorded in 1983. (AP PhotoCopyright Raiford Communications) IMAGE MAY ONLY BE USED FOR 3 DAYS FROM TIME OF TRANSMISSION NO ARCHIVING NO LICENSING. PUBLIC OUT.
In this June 10, 1983 frame grab of video made available by Raiford Communications, Inc., former president Richard Nixon talks about his 1974 resignation in a series of interviews conducted by former White House aide Frank Gannon in New York City. The Richard Nixon Presidential Library and the privately held Nixon Foundation are co-releasing a trove of videotaped interviews with the former president to mark the 40th anniversary of his resignation following the Watergate scandal. The 28 minutes of tape, detailing Nixon's personal turmoil in his final week in office, were culled from more than 30 hours of tape recorded in 1983. (AP Photo/Copyright Raiford Communications) IMAGE MAY ONLY BE USED FOR 3 DAYS FROM TIME OF TRANSMISSION; NO ARCHIVING; NO LICENSING. PUBLIC OUT.
In this Aug. 9, 1974 file photo, Richard Nixon waves goodbye with a salute to his staff members outside the White House as he boards a helicopter and e resigns the presidency on Aug. 9, 1974. He was the first president in American history to resign the nations highest office. (AP Photo, File)
In this Aug. 9, 1974 file photo, Richard Nixon waves goodbye with a salute to his staff members outside the White House as he boards a helicopter and e resigns the presidency on Aug. 9, 1974. He was the first president in American history to resign the nation's highest office. (AP Photo, File)
In this July 24, 1969 file photo, President Richard Nixon, right, greets the Apollo 11 astronauts in the quarantine van on board the U.S.S. Hornet after splashdown and recovery. The Apollo 11 crew from left are Neil Armstrong, Michael Collins, and Edwin Buzz Aldrin. Armstrong and Aldrin became the first men to walk on the moon after blastoff from Cape Kennedy, Fla., on July 16, 1969. (AP Photo, File)
In this July 24, 1969 file photo, President Richard Nixon, right, greets the Apollo 11 astronauts in the quarantine van on board the U.S.S. Hornet after splashdown and recovery. The Apollo 11 crew from left are Neil Armstrong, Michael Collins, and Edwin "Buzz" Aldrin. Armstrong and Aldrin became the first men to walk on the moon after blastoff from Cape Kennedy, Fla., on July 16, 1969. (AP Photo, File)
In this May 11, 1973 file picture, convicted Watergate defendants Bernard L. Barker, center, and Eugenio R. Martinez, left, arrive handcuffed at the Senate Office Building before their meeting with sepcial investigators in Washington. Bernard Leon Barker, a Cuban-born CIA operative who participated in the Bay of Pigs invasion and was later a Watergate burglar, has died in Florida. He was 92. Barkers stepdaughter says that he died Friday morning, June 5, 2009 at his suburban Miami home after being taken to the Veterans Administration Medical Center the night before. He had suffered from cancer and heart problems but his exact cause of death was unclear. (AP PhotoFile)
In this May 11, 1973 file picture, convicted Watergate defendants Bernard L. Barker, center, and Eugenio R. Martinez, left, arrive handcuffed at the Senate Office Building before their meeting with sepcial investigators in Washington. Bernard Leon Barker, a Cuban-born CIA operative who participated in the Bay of Pigs invasion and was later a Watergate burglar, has died in Florida. He was 92. Barker's stepdaughter says that he died Friday morning, June 5, 2009 at his suburban Miami home after being taken to the Veteran's Administration Medical Center the night before. He had suffered from cancer and heart problems but his exact cause of death was unclear. (AP Photo/File)
In this 1973 file photo, Rose Mary Woods, President Richard Nixons secretary at her White House desk, demonstrates the Rose Mary Stretch which could have resulted in the erasure of part of the Watergate tapes. Every year the National Security Archive, a private group at The George Washington University that publishes declassifed government documents and files large numbers of FOIA requests, gives an award to the federal agency with the worst Freedom of Information Act performance. Named the Rosemary Award, after Woods, the fifth annual award has been won by the FBI. (AP PhotoFile)
In this 1973 file photo, Rose Mary Woods, President Richard Nixon's secretary at her White House desk, demonstrates the "Rose Mary Stretch" which could have resulted in the erasure of part of the Watergate tapes. Every year the National Security Archive, a private group at The George Washington University that publishes declassifed government documents and files large numbers of FOIA requests, gives an award to the federal agency with the worst Freedom of Information Act performance. Named the Rosemary Award, after Woods, the fifth annual award has been "won" by the FBI. (AP Photo/File)
bnv.wtop.photogalleries/history;history=main;tile=3;pos=mid1;sz=300x250;ord=
This combination of two images of notes provided by the National Archives and Records Administration shows two pages of notes written by President Richard Nixons chief of staff H.R. Haldeman from a June 20, 1972, meeting with Nixon, that will undergo forensic analysis at the National Archives to see if they hold clues to one of the Watergate scandals enduring mysteries. Researchers hope to learn what Nixon said during the infamous 18 12-minute gap in a tape recording of his meeting with Haldeman that day. Electrostatic detection analysis and other tools can find indented images, such as those left on a sheet of paper when a pen has written on a sheet above it. This might show evidence that certain pages were destroyed and even point to words long lost to history. (AP PhotoCourtesy of the National Archives and Records Administration)
This combination of two images of notes provided by the National Archives and Records Administration shows two pages of notes written by President Richard Nixon's chief of staff H.R. Haldeman from a June 20, 1972, meeting with Nixon, that will undergo forensic analysis at the National Archives to see if they hold clues to one of the Watergate scandal's enduring mysteries. Researchers hope to learn what Nixon said during the infamous 18 1/2-minute gap in a tape recording of his meeting with Haldeman that day. Electrostatic detection analysis and other tools can find indented images, such as those left on a sheet of paper when a pen has written on a sheet above it. This might show evidence that certain pages were destroyed and even point to words long lost to history. (AP Photo/Courtesy of the National Archives and Records Administration)
The original Nixon White House tape recorder is shown in an undated handout photo. Decades after the fighting over his tapes began, Richard Nixon is finally getting at least part of his wish. The National Archives, under a court order it had fought for years, on Monday, August 10, 1998 will begin cutting up the original tapes from the Watergate years and returning portions dealing with private matters to the late presidents estate. (AP PhotoNational Archives)
The original Nixon White House tape recorder is shown in an undated handout photo. Decades after the fighting over his tapes began, Richard Nixon is finally getting at least part of his wish. The National Archives, under a court order it had fought for years, on Monday, August 10, 1998 will begin cutting up the original tapes from the Watergate years and returning portions dealing with private matters to the late president's estate. (AP Photo/National Archives)
Original tapes from the Nixon White House are shown in this undated handout photo. Decades after the fighting over his tapes began, Richard Nixon is finally getting at least part of his wish. The National Archives, under a court order it had fought for years, on Monday, August 10, 1998 will begin cutting up the original tapes from the Watergate years and returning portions dealing with private matters to the late presidents estate. (AP PhotoNational Archives)
Original tapes from the Nixon White House are shown in this undated handout photo. Decades after the fighting over his tapes began, Richard Nixon is finally getting at least part of his wish. The National Archives, under a court order it had fought for years, on Monday, August 10, 1998 will begin cutting up the original tapes from the Watergate years and returning portions dealing with private matters to the late president's estate. (AP Photo/National Archives)
Named in Watergate affair are from left to right G. Gordon Liddy, White House Counsel John W. Dean III, Former Attorney General John N. Mitchell, and Former Deputy Canpaign Manager for Nixons Re-election Jeb Stuart Magruder. (AP PHOTO)
Named in Watergate affair are from left to right: G. Gordon Liddy, White House Counsel John W. Dean III, Former Attorney General John N. Mitchell, and Former Deputy Canpaign Manager for Nixon's Re-election Jeb Stuart Magruder. (AP PHOTO)
Watergate burglar E. Howard Hunt, left, embraces Cuban exile Manuel Artime, a leader of the 1963 Bay of Pigs invasion of Cuba, after a news conference in Miami, in this March 3, 1977 file photo. Hunt, who helped organize the Watergate break-in that led to the greatest scandal in American political history and the downfall of Richard Nixons presidency, died Tuesday, Jan 23, 2007. He was 88. (AP Photo)
Watergate burglar E. Howard Hunt, left, embraces Cuban exile Manuel Artime, a leader of the 1963 Bay of Pigs invasion of Cuba, after a news conference in Miami, in this March 3, 1977 file photo. Hunt, who helped organize the Watergate break-in that led to the greatest scandal in American political history and the downfall of Richard Nixon's presidency, died Tuesday, Jan 23, 2007. He was 88. (AP Photo)
bnv.wtop.photogalleries/history;history=main;tile=3;pos=mid1;sz=300x250;ord=
In this May 11, 2002 file photo, a visitor at a time-line narration of the Watergate developments leading to the resignation of former President Richard at The Nixon Library Birthplace in Yorba Linda, Calif. On Thursday March 31, 2011, Richard Nixon Library archivists will present a retold and expanded version of the Watergate scandal at the library, a 500,000 makeover they say is faithful to fact, balanced and devoid of political judgment. (AP Photo Damian Dovarganes, File)
In this May 11, 2002 file photo, a visitor at a time-line narration of the Watergate developments leading to the resignation of former President Richard at The Nixon Library & Birthplace in Yorba Linda, Calif. On Thursday March 31, 2011, Richard Nixon Library archivists will present a retold and expanded version of the Watergate scandal at the library, a $500,000 makeover they say is faithful to fact, balanced and devoid of political judgment. (AP Photo /Damian Dovarganes, File)
This is the the view of the Watergate complex, right, from room 723 of the former Howard Johnson Hotel in Washington Tuesday, June 17, 1997, on the 25th anniversary of the Watergate break-in, which led to the downfall of President Nixon. The room was used as a look-out during the break-in of the Democratic National Committee in the Watergate. (AP PhotoSusan Walsh)
This is the the view of the Watergate complex, right, from room 723 of the former Howard Johnson Hotel in Washington Tuesday, June 17, 1997, on the 25th anniversary of the Watergate break-in, which led to the downfall of President Nixon. The room was used as a look-out during the break-in of the Democratic National Committee in the Watergate. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh)
Jason Welch of Hampton, Va. displays the purported lock to the door of the Democratic National Committee headquarters at the Watergate complex that was burglarized 25 years ago at an auction Monday, May 26, 1997 in Hampton, Va. where it fetched a high bid of 13,000. Jim Herrald, a retired superintendent from the Watergate complex who owns the lock, wants to see if higher offers may come in before he accepts the bid. His request is that we see if we can get the offer in writing and hold it for 10 days and see if we can get any other offers, said Gail Wolpin, owner of Phoebus Auction Gallery. The high bid came from an absentee bidder from Boston who did not want to be identified, said Bill Welch, a gallery employee. Ms. Wolpin said she did not want to go under 25,000 for the item symbolizing the downfall of the Nixon administration. (AP PhotoGary C. Knapp)
Jason Welch of Hampton, Va. displays the purported lock to the door of the Democratic National Committee headquarters at the Watergate complex that was burglarized 25 years ago at an auction Monday, May 26, 1997 in Hampton, Va. where it fetched a high bid of $13,000. Jim Herrald, a retired superintendent from the Watergate complex who owns the lock, wants to see if higher offers may come in before he accepts the bid. "His request is that we see if we can get the offer in writing and hold it for 10 days and see if we can get any other offers," said Gail Wolpin, owner of Phoebus Auction Gallery. The high bid came from an absentee bidder from Boston who did not want to be identified, said Bill Welch, a gallery employee. Ms. Wolpin said she did not want to go under $25,000 for the item symbolizing the downfall of the Nixon administration. (AP Photo/Gary C. Knapp)
President Nixon, left, walks to the White House with aide H.R. Haldeman in this December, 1969, photo from files. Recently released tapes capture Nixon ordering the theft of the Brookings Institution s files on Vietnam a year before the Watergate break-in, the San Francisco Examiner reported Thursday, Nov. 21, 1996. During a June 30, 1971, Oval Office conversation, Nixon asked Haldeman to take the liberal think tank s files relating to the Vietnam War, the Examiner said. (AP Photo)
President Nixon, left, walks to the White House with aide H.R. Haldeman in this December, 1969, photo from files. Recently released tapes capture Nixon ordering the theft of the Brookings Institution s files on Vietnam a year before the Watergate break-in, the San Francisco Examiner reported Thursday, Nov. 21, 1996. During a June 30, 1971, Oval Office conversation, Nixon asked Haldeman to take the liberal think tank s files relating to the Vietnam War, the Examiner said. (AP Photo)
Tape recordings made by former President Richard Nixon, shown in this 1973 file photo, were released today by his estate and include almost 3,700 hours of still-unheard White House tapes, many made while Nixon was embroiled in the Watergate scandal that ended his presidency. Until now only 63 hours of tape has been available to the public. (AP Photofile)
Tape recordings made by former President Richard Nixon, shown in this 1973 file photo, were released today by his estate and include almost 3,700 hours of still-unheard White House tapes, many made while Nixon was embroiled in the Watergate scandal that ended his presidency. Until now only 63 hours of tape has been available to the public. (AP Photo/file)
bnv.wtop.photogalleries/history;history=main;tile=3;pos=mid1;sz=300x250;ord=
H.R. Haldeman, former aide to President Nixon, talks to the media in Washington in this 1973 file photo. (AP Photo, File)
H.R. Haldeman, former aide to President Nixon, talks to the media in Washington in this 1973 file photo. (AP Photo, File)
Former President Richard Nixon exhibited these expressions during Wednesday night, May 5, 1977 telecast of interview with David Frost. During the paid for interview, Nixon insisted he had not obstructed justice and had not committed in his own opinion an impeachable offense. Photos from WNEW TV monitor. (AP PhotoRay Stubblebine)
Former President Richard Nixon exhibited these expressions during Wednesday night, May 5, 1977 telecast of interview with David Frost. During the paid for interview, Nixon insisted he had not obstructed justice and had not committed in his own opinion an impeachable offense. Photos from WNEW TV monitor. (AP Photo/Ray Stubblebine)
In this Aug. 9, 1974 black-and-white file photo, President Richard M. Nixon and his wife Pat Nixon are shown standing together in the East Room of the White House in Washington. Thirty-six years after Nixon testified secretly to a grand jury investigating Watergate, a federal judge orders the first public release of the transcript. (AP PhotoCharlie Harrity, File)
In this Aug. 9, 1974 black-and-white file photo, President Richard M. Nixon and his wife Pat Nixon are shown standing together in the East Room of the White House in Washington. Thirty-six years after Nixon testified secretly to a grand jury investigating Watergate, a federal judge orders the first public release of the transcript. (AP Photo/Charlie Harrity, File)
In this June 25, 1974, photo released by the White House, President Richard Nixon listens to his Secretary of State Dr. Henry Kissinger aboard the plane that brought the U.S. president to Belgium. Within two months Nixon had resigned, and in June 1975, the feisty ex-President defended his shredded legacy and shady Watergate-era actions in grand jury testimony that he thought would never come out. On Thursday, Nov. 10, 2011, it did. (AP PhotoWhite House Photo, Ollie Akins)
In this June 25, 1974, photo released by the White House, President Richard Nixon listens to his Secretary of State Dr. Henry Kissinger aboard the plane that brought the U.S. president to Belgium. Within two months Nixon had resigned, and in June 1975, the feisty ex-President defended his shredded legacy and shady Watergate-era actions in grand jury testimony that he thought would never come out. On Thursday, Nov. 10, 2011, it did. (AP Photo/White House Photo, Ollie Akins)
President Richard M. Nixon is shown pointing to the transcripts of the White House tapes in this April 29, 1974, file photo, after he announced during a nationally-televised speech that he would turn over the transcripts to House impeachment investigators. 30 years ago, on Aug. 9, 1974, US-President Richard M. Nixon resigned due to the Watergate affair. (AP Photo)
President Richard M. Nixon is shown pointing to the transcripts of the White House tapes in this April 29, 1974, file photo, after he announced during a nationally-televised speech that he would turn over the transcripts to House impeachment investigators. 30 years ago, on Aug. 9, 1974, US-President Richard M. Nixon resigned due to the Watergate affair. (AP Photo)
bnv.wtop.photogalleries/history;history=main;tile=3;pos=mid1;sz=300x250;ord=
In this March 1, 1974 photo, former White House attorney Charles Colson talks to reporters after he was charged in the Watergate cover-up in Washington. Colson, the tough-as-nails special counsel to President Richard Nixon who went to prison for his role in a Watergate-related case and became a Christian evangelical helping inmates, has died. He was 80. Jim Liske, chief executive of the Lansdowne-based Prison Fellowship Ministries that Colson founded, said Colson died Saturday, April 21, 2012. (AP PhotoCharles Bennett)
In this March 1, 1974 photo, former White House attorney Charles Colson talks to reporters after he was charged in the Watergate cover-up in Washington. Colson, the tough-as-nails special counsel to President Richard Nixon who went to prison for his role in a Watergate-related case and became a Christian evangelical helping inmates, has died. He was 80. Jim Liske, chief executive of the Lansdowne-based Prison Fellowship Ministries that Colson founded, said Colson died Saturday, April 21, 2012. (AP Photo/Charles Bennett)
In a cartoon from Pravda, the Soviet Communist party newspaper, a figure labeled reactionary press at right, attempts to raise the cold war from its coffin on August 8, 1973. Wreath before the coffin at left reads Tel Aviv. Wreath in center reads NATO soviet insistence that the cold war is dead may explain the reluctance of the Soviet press to take a critical stance towards President Nixon in Watergate coverage. (AP Photo)
In a cartoon from Pravda, the Soviet Communist party newspaper, a figure labeled "reactionary press" at right, attempts to raise the cold war from its coffin on August 8, 1973. Wreath before the coffin at left reads "Tel Aviv." Wreath in center reads "NATO" soviet insistence that the cold war is dead may explain the reluctance of the Soviet press to take a critical stance towards President Nixon in Watergate coverage. (AP Photo)
This photograph shows the first and last pages of the complaint filed in federal court in Washington, D.C., by the Senate Watergate Committee, Thursday, Aug. 9, 1973. The complaint names as defendant Richard M. Nixon, individually and as President of the United States. The signatures appear on the last page of the complaint. (AP Photo)
This photograph shows the first and last pages of the complaint filed in federal court in Washington, D.C., by the Senate Watergate Committee, Thursday, Aug. 9, 1973. The complaint names as defendant Richard M. Nixon, individually and as President of the United States. The signatures appear on the last page of the complaint. (AP Photo)
President Nixon sits in his White House office, August 16, 1973, as he poses for pictures after delivering a nationwide television address dealing with Watergate. Nixon repeated that he had no prior knowledge of the Watergate break-in and was not aware of any cover-up. (AP Photostf)
President Nixon sits in his White House office, August 16, 1973, as he poses for pictures after delivering a nationwide television address dealing with Watergate. Nixon repeated that he had no prior knowledge of the Watergate break-in and was not aware of any cover-up. (AP Photo/stf)
U.S. President Richard Nixon reacts to the thundering applause as he arrived for a speech on Wednesday, May 9, 1973 in Washington to Republican campaign contributors. Nixon told the gathering, he will get to the bottom of the Watergate scandal. (AP PhotoJohn Duricka)
U.S. President Richard Nixon reacts to the thundering applause as he arrived for a speech on Wednesday, May 9, 1973 in Washington to Republican campaign contributors. Nixon told the gathering, he will get to the bottom of the Watergate scandal. (AP Photo/John Duricka)
bnv.wtop.photogalleries/history;history=main;tile=3;pos=mid1;sz=300x250;ord=
President Nixon tells a White House news conference, March 15, 1973, that he will not allow his legal counsel, John Dean, to testify on Capitol Hill in the Watergate investigation and challenged the Senate to test him in the Supreme Court. (AP PhotoCharles Tasnadi)
President Nixon tells a White House news conference, March 15, 1973, that he will not allow his legal counsel, John Dean, to testify on Capitol Hill in the Watergate investigation and challenged the Senate to test him in the Supreme Court. (AP Photo/Charles Tasnadi)
The Royal Baby

The Royal Baby

Prince George is going to be a big brother. A look at his best photos.
Famous Locals

Famous Locals

Celebrities, authors and musicians who grew up here before becoming famous.
Clooney Through the Years

Clooney Through the Years

George Clooney has gotten married. Look back at his best moments.
Potomac House Tour

Potomac House Tour

These elegant homes were open for tours over the weekend.
Click on the image above to see it at its original size.

18 / 38

Photo Galleries

< >