AUTOPLAY 

US Secretary of State John Kerry pays respect during the inauguration of the Tony Vaccaro square, in front of the city hall of Saint-Briac-sur-Mer, western France, Saturday, June, 7, 2014 in front of one of Voccaros photos. (AP PhotoJean Sebastien Evrard, Pool)
US Secretary of State John Kerry pays respect during the inauguration of the Tony Vaccaro square, in front of the city hall of Saint-Briac-sur-Mer, western France, Saturday, June, 7, 2014 in front of one of Voccaro's photos. (AP Photo/Jean Sebastien Evrard, Pool)
An American flag is placed in the sand of Omaha Beach, western France, Friday, June 6, 2014. Veterans and Normandy residents are paying tribute to the thousands who gave their lives in the D-Day invasion of Nazi-occupied France 70 years ago. World leaders and dignitaries including President Barack Obama and Queen Elizabeth II will gather to honor the more than 150,000 American, British, Canadian and other Allied D-Day troops who risked and gave their lives to defeat Adolf Hitlers Third Reich. (AP PhotoThibault Camus)
An American flag is placed in the sand of Omaha Beach, western France, Friday, June 6, 2014. Veterans and Normandy residents are paying tribute to the thousands who gave their lives in the D-Day invasion of Nazi-occupied France 70 years ago. World leaders and dignitaries including President Barack Obama and Queen Elizabeth II will gather to honor the more than 150,000 American, British, Canadian and other Allied D-Day troops who risked and gave their lives to defeat Adolf Hitler's Third Reich. (AP Photo/Thibault Camus)
Men in WWII military uniforms gesture on Omaha Beach in Vierville sur Mer, western France , Friday June 6, 2014. World leaders and dignitaries including President Barack Obama and Queen Elizabeth II will gather to honor the more than 150,000 American, British, Canadian and other Allied D-Day troops who risked and gave their lives to defeat Adolf Hitlers Third Reich. (AP PhotoThibault Camus)
Men in WWII military uniforms gesture on Omaha Beach in Vierville sur Mer, western France , Friday June 6, 2014. World leaders and dignitaries including President Barack Obama and Queen Elizabeth II will gather to honor the more than 150,000 American, British, Canadian and other Allied D-Day troops who risked and gave their lives to defeat Adolf Hitler's Third Reich. (AP Photo/Thibault Camus)
US President Barack Obama, left, and French President Francois Hollande look out over Omaha beach during a joint French-US D-Day commemoration ceremony at the Normandy American Cemetery and Memorial in Colleville-sur-mer, Normandy, France, Friday June 6, 2014, marking the 70th anniversary of the World War II Allied landings in Normandy. (AP PhotoAlain Jocard, pool)
US President Barack Obama, left, and French President Francois Hollande look out over Omaha beach during a joint French-US D-Day commemoration ceremony at the Normandy American Cemetery and Memorial in Colleville-sur-mer, Normandy, France, Friday June 6, 2014, marking the 70th anniversary of the World War II Allied landings in Normandy. (AP Photo/Alain Jocard, pool)
U.S. President Barack Obama, left, acknowledges veterans as he speaks at the Normandy American Cemetery, at Omaha Beach as he participates in the 70th anniversary of D-Day in Colleville sur Mer in Normandy, France, Friday, June 6, 2014. (AP PhotoCharles Dharapak)
U.S. President Barack Obama, left, acknowledges veterans as he speaks at the Normandy American Cemetery, at Omaha Beach as he participates in the 70th anniversary of D-Day in Colleville sur Mer in Normandy, France, Friday, June 6, 2014. (AP Photo/Charles Dharapak)
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A veteran talks to U.S. President Barack Obama, at the Normandy American Cemetery, at Omaha Beach as he participates in the 70th anniversary of D-Day in Colleville sur Mer, Normandy, France, Friday, June 6, 2014. (AP PhotoCharles Dharapak)
A veteran talks to U.S. President Barack Obama, at the Normandy American Cemetery, at Omaha Beach as he participates in the 70th anniversary of D-Day in Colleville sur Mer, Normandy, France, Friday, June 6, 2014. (AP Photo/Charles Dharapak)
A veteran talks to U.S. President Barack Obama, at the Normandy American Cemetery, at Omaha Beach as he participates in the 70th anniversary of D-Day in Colleville sur Mer, Normandy, France, Friday, June 6, 2014. (AP PhotoCharles Dharapak)
A veteran talks to U.S. President Barack Obama, at the Normandy American Cemetery, at Omaha Beach as he participates in the 70th anniversary of D-Day in Colleville sur Mer, Normandy, France, Friday, June 6, 2014. (AP PhotoCharles Dharapak)
A veteran talks to U.S. President Barack Obama, at the Normandy American Cemetery, at Omaha Beach as he participates in the 70th anniversary of D-Day in Colleville sur Mer, Normandy, France, Friday, June 6, 2014. (AP PhotoCharles Dharapak)
A veteran talks to U.S. President Barack Obama, at the Normandy American Cemetery, at Omaha Beach as he participates in the 70th anniversary of D-Day in Colleville sur Mer, Normandy, France, Friday, June 6, 2014. (AP PhotoCharles Dharapak)
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A veteran talks to U.S. President Barack Obama, at the Normandy American Cemetery, at Omaha Beach as he participates in the 70th anniversary of D-Day in Colleville sur Mer, Normandy, France, Friday, June 6, 2014. (AP PhotoCharles Dharapak)
A veteran talks to U.S. President Barack Obama, at the Normandy American Cemetery, at Omaha Beach as he participates in the 70th anniversary of D-Day in Colleville sur Mer, Normandy, France, Friday, June 6, 2014. (AP PhotoCharles Dharapak)
A veteran talks to U.S. President Barack Obama, at the Normandy American Cemetery, at Omaha Beach as he participates in the 70th anniversary of D-Day in Colleville sur Mer, Normandy, France, Friday, June 6, 2014. (AP PhotoCharles Dharapak)
People wearing WWII military uniforms of Czechoslovakia take a snapshot of British landing craft, on the beach of Arromanches, western France , Friday June 6, 2014. Ceremonies to commemorate the 70th anniversary of D-Day are drawing thousands of visitors to the cemeteries, beaches and stone-walled villages of Normandy this week, including some of the few remaining survivors of the largest sea-borne invasion ever mounted. (AP PhotoThibault Camus)
People wearing WWII military uniforms of Czechoslovakia take a snapshot of British landing craft, on the beach of Arromanches, western France , Friday June 6, 2014. Ceremonies to commemorate the 70th anniversary of D-Day are drawing thousands of visitors to the cemeteries, beaches and stone-walled villages of Normandy this week, including some of the few remaining survivors of the largest sea-borne invasion ever mounted. (AP Photo/Thibault Camus)
U.S. President Barack Obama, front left, participates in the 70th French-American commemoration D-Day ceremony at the Normandy American Cemetery and Memorial in Colleville-sur-Mer, France on Friday, June 6, 2014. World leaders and veterans gathered by the beaches of Normandy on Friday to mark the 70th anniversary of World War Twos D-Day landings. (AP PhotoPascal Rossignol, Pool)
U.S. President Barack Obama, front left, participates in the 70th French-American commemoration D-Day ceremony at the Normandy American Cemetery and Memorial in Colleville-sur-Mer, France on Friday, June 6, 2014. World leaders and veterans gathered by the beaches of Normandy on Friday to mark the 70th anniversary of World War Two's D-Day landings. (AP Photo/Pascal Rossignol, Pool)
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A World War Two veteran, second right, meets U.S. President Barack Obama as they participate in the 70th French-American commemoration D-Day ceremony at the Normandy American Cemetery and Memorial in Colleville-sur-Mer, France on Friday, June 6, 2014. World leaders and veterans gathered by the beaches of Normandy on Friday to mark the 70th anniversary of World War Twos D-Day landings. (AP PhotoPascal Rossignol, Pool)
A World War Two veteran, second right, meets U.S. President Barack Obama as they participate in the 70th French-American commemoration D-Day ceremony at the Normandy American Cemetery and Memorial in Colleville-sur-Mer, France on Friday, June 6, 2014. World leaders and veterans gathered by the beaches of Normandy on Friday to mark the 70th anniversary of World War Two's D-Day landings. (AP Photo/Pascal Rossignol, Pool)
King Willem-Alexander, second right, and Queen Maxima of The Netherlands arrive at a ceremony in honor at all combatants who landed in Arromanches on the 6 June 1944, and liberated Europe, in Arromanches, France, Friday, June 6, 2014. Veterans and Normandy residents are paying tribute to the thousands who gave their lives in the D-Day invasion of Nazi-occupied France 70 years ago. World leaders and dignitaries including President Barack Obama and Queen Elizabeth II will gather to honor the more than 150,000 American, British, Canadian and other Allied D-Day troops who risked and gave their lives to defeat Adolf Hitlers Third Reich. (AP PhotoClaude Paris)
King Willem-Alexander, second right, and Queen Maxima of The Netherlands arrive at a ceremony in honor at all combatants who landed in Arromanches on the 6 June 1944, and liberated Europe, in Arromanches, France, Friday, June 6, 2014. Veterans and Normandy residents are paying tribute to the thousands who gave their lives in the D-Day invasion of Nazi-occupied France 70 years ago. World leaders and dignitaries including President Barack Obama and Queen Elizabeth II will gather to honor the more than 150,000 American, British, Canadian and other Allied D-Day troops who risked and gave their lives to defeat Adolf Hitler's Third Reich. (AP Photo/Claude Paris)
People wearing WWII style clothes look toward the sea, on the beach of Arromanches, western France, Friday June 6, 2014. Ceremonies to commemorate the 70th anniversary of D-Day are drawing thousands of visitors to the cemeteries, beaches and stone-walled villages of Normandy this week, including some of the few remaining survivors of the largest sea-borne invasion ever mounted. (AP PhotoThibault Camus)
People wearing WWII style clothes look toward the sea, on the beach of Arromanches, western France, Friday June 6, 2014. Ceremonies to commemorate the 70th anniversary of D-Day are drawing thousands of visitors to the cemeteries, beaches and stone-walled villages of Normandy this week, including some of the few remaining survivors of the largest sea-borne invasion ever mounted. (AP Photo/Thibault Camus)
Gen. Philip M. Breedlove Commander, U.S. Air Forces in Europe, right, shakes hands with U.S WW II veteran 90-year-old Curtis Philipps from Georgia, who landed in Picauville on June 6, 1944, during a ceremony in homage to the English and American airborne and pilots, at the Memorial of airborne and US Air Force, in Picauville, France, as part of the commemoration of the 70th D-Day anniversary, Thursday, June 5, 2014. World leaders and veterans prepare to mark the 70th anniversary of the invasion this week in Normandy. (AP PhotoClaude Paris)
Gen. Philip M. Breedlove Commander, U.S. Air Forces in Europe, right, shakes hands with U.S WW II veteran 90-year-old Curtis Philipps from Georgia, who landed in Picauville on June 6, 1944, during a ceremony in homage to the English and American airborne and pilots, at the Memorial of airborne and US Air Force, in Picauville, France, as part of the commemoration of the 70th D-Day anniversary, Thursday, June 5, 2014. World leaders and veterans prepare to mark the 70th anniversary of the invasion this week in Normandy. (AP Photo/Claude Paris)
Gen. Richard D. Clarke, left, of West Point U.S. Military Academy, speaks with U.S WW II veteran 90 year old Carmel Whetzel, right, from Winchester, VA, during a ceremony in homage at paratroopers of the 82th and 101th airborne, in Sainte-Mere-Eglise, France, as part of the commemoration of the 70th D-Day anniversary, Thursday, June 5, 2014. World leaders and veterans prepare to mark the 70th anniversary of the invasion this week in Normandy. (AP PhotoClaude Paris)
Gen. Richard D. Clarke, left, of West Point U.S. Military Academy, speaks with U.S WW II veteran 90 year old Carmel Whetzel, right, from Winchester, VA, during a ceremony in homage at paratroopers of the 82th and 101th airborne, in Sainte-Mere-Eglise, France, as part of the commemoration of the 70th D-Day anniversary, Thursday, June 5, 2014. World leaders and veterans prepare to mark the 70th anniversary of the invasion this week in Normandy. (AP Photo/Claude Paris)
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93 year old U.S WW II veteran Jim Martin of the 101st Airborne, left, completes a tandem parachute jump onto Utah Beach, western France, Thursday June 5, 2014, as part of the commemoration of the 70th anniversary of the D Day. World leaders and veterans prepare to mark the 70th anniversary of the invasion this week in Normandy. (AP PhotoThibault Camus)
93 year old U.S WW II veteran Jim Martin of the 101st Airborne, left, completes a tandem parachute jump onto Utah Beach, western France, Thursday June 5, 2014, as part of the commemoration of the 70th anniversary of the D Day. World leaders and veterans prepare to mark the 70th anniversary of the invasion this week in Normandy. (AP Photo/Thibault Camus)
Australian World War II veterans place crosses and flags at graves before attending the French-British ceremony at the British War cemetery in Bayeux, Normandy, France, Friday, June 6, 2014. World leaders and veterans gathered by the beaches of Normandy on Friday to mark the 70th anniversary of World War Twos D-Day landings. (AP PhotoLeon Neal, pool)
Australian World War II veterans place crosses and flags at graves before attending the French-British ceremony at the British War cemetery in Bayeux, Normandy, France, Friday, June 6, 2014. World leaders and veterans gathered by the beaches of Normandy on Friday to mark the 70th anniversary of World War Two's D-Day landings. (AP Photo/Leon Neal, pool)
People stand on Omaha Beach in Vierville sur Mer, western France , Friday June 6, 2014. Veterans and Normandy residents are paying tribute to the thousands who gave their lives in the D-Day invasion of Nazi-occupied France 70 years ago. (AP PhotoThibault Camus)
People stand on Omaha Beach in Vierville sur Mer, western France , Friday June 6, 2014. Veterans and Normandy residents are paying tribute to the thousands who gave their lives in the D-Day invasion of Nazi-occupied France 70 years ago. (AP Photo/Thibault Camus)
A military enthusiast takes a snapshot of Omaha Beach, western France, Friday June 6, 2014. Veterans and Normandy residents are paying tribute to the thousands who gave their lives in the D-Day invasion of Nazi-occupied France 70 years ago. World leaders and dignitaries including President Barack Obama and Queen Elizabeth II will gather to honor the more than 150,000 American, British, Canadian and other Allied D-Day troops who risked and gave their lives to defeat Adolf Hitlers Third Reich.(AP PhotoThibault Camus
A military enthusiast takes a snapshot of Omaha Beach, western France, Friday June 6, 2014. Veterans and Normandy residents are paying tribute to the thousands who gave their lives in the D-Day invasion of Nazi-occupied France 70 years ago. World leaders and dignitaries including President Barack Obama and Queen Elizabeth II will gather to honor the more than 150,000 American, British, Canadian and other Allied D-Day troops who risked and gave their lives to defeat Adolf Hitler's Third Reich.(AP Photo/Thibault Camus
Military enthusiasts walk on Omaha Beach Vierville sur Mer, western France , Friday June 6, 2014. World leaders and dignitaries including President Barack Obama and Queen Elizabeth II will gather to honor the more than 150,000 American, British, Canadian and other Allied D-Day troops who risked and gave their lives to defeat Adolf Hitlers Third Reich. (AP PhotoThibault Camus)
Military enthusiasts walk on Omaha Beach Vierville sur Mer, western France , Friday June 6, 2014. World leaders and dignitaries including President Barack Obama and Queen Elizabeth II will gather to honor the more than 150,000 American, British, Canadian and other Allied D-Day troops who risked and gave their lives to defeat Adolf Hitler's Third Reich. (AP Photo/Thibault Camus)
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World War II veteran of the U.S. 29th Infantry Division, Morley Piper, 90, Mass., salutes during a D-Day commemoration, on Omaha Beach in Vierville sur Mer, western France , Friday June 6, 2014. Veterans and Normandy residents are paying tribute to the thousands who gave their lives in the D-Day invasion of Nazi-occupied France 70 years ago. (AP PhotoThibault Camus)
World War II veteran of the U.S. 29th Infantry Division, Morley Piper, 90, Mass., salutes during a D-Day commemoration, on Omaha Beach in Vierville sur Mer, western France , Friday June 6, 2014. Veterans and Normandy residents are paying tribute to the thousands who gave their lives in the D-Day invasion of Nazi-occupied France 70 years ago. (AP Photo/Thibault Camus)
World War II veteran of the U.S. army 29th Infantry Division, Don McCarthy, 90, from Rhode Island, center, arrives for a D-Day commemoration, on Omaha Beach, western France, Friday June 6, 2014. Veterans and Normandy residents are paying tribute to the thousands who gave their lives in the D-Day invasion of Nazi-occupied France 70 years ago. World leaders and dignitaries including President Barack Obama and Queen Elizabeth II will gather to honor the more than 150,000 American, British, Canadian and other Allied D-Day troops who risked and gave their lives to defeat Adolf Hitlers Third Reich. (AP PhotoThibault Camus)
World War II veteran of the U.S. army 29th Infantry Division, Don McCarthy, 90, from Rhode Island, center, arrives for a D-Day commemoration, on Omaha Beach, western France, Friday June 6, 2014. Veterans and Normandy residents are paying tribute to the thousands who gave their lives in the D-Day invasion of Nazi-occupied France 70 years ago. World leaders and dignitaries including President Barack Obama and Queen Elizabeth II will gather to honor the more than 150,000 American, British, Canadian and other Allied D-Day troops who risked and gave their lives to defeat Adolf Hitler's Third Reich. (AP Photo/Thibault Camus)
From left, World War II veterans of the U.S. 29th Infantry Division, Hal Baumgarten, 90 from Pennsylvania, Steve Melnikoff, 94, from Maryland, Don McCarthy, 90 from Rhode Island, and Morley Piper, 90, from Massachusetts, attend a D-Day commemoration, on Omaha Beach, western France , Friday June 6, 2014. Veterans and Normandy residents are paying tribute to the thousands who gave their lives in the D-Day invasion of Nazi-occupied France 70 years ago. World leaders and dignitaries including President Barack Obama and Queen Elizabeth II will gather to honor the more than 150,000 American, British, Canadian and other Allied D-Day troops who risked and gave their lives to defeat Adolf Hitlers Third Reich. (AP PhotoThibault Camus)
From left, World War II veterans of the U.S. 29th Infantry Division, Hal Baumgarten, 90 from Pennsylvania, Steve Melnikoff, 94, from Maryland, Don McCarthy, 90 from Rhode Island, and Morley Piper, 90, from Massachusetts, attend a D-Day commemoration, on Omaha Beach, western France , Friday June 6, 2014. Veterans and Normandy residents are paying tribute to the thousands who gave their lives in the D-Day invasion of Nazi-occupied France 70 years ago. World leaders and dignitaries including President Barack Obama and Queen Elizabeth II will gather to honor the more than 150,000 American, British, Canadian and other Allied D-Day troops who risked and gave their lives to defeat Adolf Hitler's Third Reich. (AP Photo/Thibault Camus)
World War II veterans of the U.S. 29th Infantry Division, Hal Baumgarten, right, 90, of Pennsylvania, and Steve Melnikoff, 94, of Maryland, salute during a D-Day commemoration, on Omaha Beach in Vierville sur Mer, western France , Friday June 6, 2014. Veterans and Normandy residents are paying tribute to the thousands who gave their lives in the D-Day invasion of Nazi-occupied France 70 years ago. (AP PhotoThibault Camus)
World War II veterans of the U.S. 29th Infantry Division, Hal Baumgarten, right, 90, of Pennsylvania, and Steve Melnikoff, 94, of Maryland, salute during a D-Day commemoration, on Omaha Beach in Vierville sur Mer, western France , Friday June 6, 2014. Veterans and Normandy residents are paying tribute to the thousands who gave their lives in the D-Day invasion of Nazi-occupied France 70 years ago. (AP Photo/Thibault Camus)
A World War Two veteran, second right, meets U.S. President Barack Obama as they participate in the 70th French-American commemoration D-Day ceremony at the Normandy American Cemetery and Memorial in Colleville-sur-Mer, France on Friday, June 6, 2014. World leaders and veterans gathered by the beaches of Normandy on Friday to mark the 70th anniversary of World War Twos D-Day landings. (AP PhotoPascal Rossignol, Pool)
A World War Two veteran, second right, meets U.S. President Barack Obama as they participate in the 70th French-American commemoration D-Day ceremony at the Normandy American Cemetery and Memorial in Colleville-sur-Mer, France on Friday, June 6, 2014. World leaders and veterans gathered by the beaches of Normandy on Friday to mark the 70th anniversary of World War Two's D-Day landings. (AP Photo/Pascal Rossignol, Pool)
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U.S. President Barack Obama, center, and French President Francois Hollande, right, smile next to World War II veteran Kenneth Rock Merritt as they arrive for the official lunch at Benouville castle, in Normandy, France, Friday, June 6, 2014. World leaders and veterans paid tribute on the 70th anniversary of the World War Two D-Day landings to soldiers who fell in the liberation of Europe from Nazi German rule, as host France sought to use the event to achieve a thaw in the Ukraine crisis. (Regis Duvignau, pool)
U.S. President Barack Obama, center, and French President Francois Hollande, right, smile next to World War II veteran Kenneth "Rock" Merritt as they arrive for the official lunch at Benouville castle, in Normandy, France, Friday, June 6, 2014. World leaders and veterans paid tribute on the 70th anniversary of the World War Two D-Day landings to soldiers who fell in the liberation of Europe from Nazi German rule, as host France sought to use the event to achieve a thaw in the Ukraine crisis. (Regis Duvignau, pool)
King Willem-Alexander, second right, and Queen Maxima of The Netherlands arrive at a ceremony in honor at all combatants who landed in Arromanches on the 6 June 1944, and liberated Europe, in Arromanches, France, Friday, June 6, 2014. Veterans and Normandy residents are paying tribute to the thousands who gave their lives in the D-Day invasion of Nazi-occupied France 70 years ago. World leaders and dignitaries including President Barack Obama and Queen Elizabeth II will gather to honor the more than 150,000 American, British, Canadian and other Allied D-Day troops who risked and gave their lives to defeat Adolf Hitlers Third Reich. (AP PhotoClaude Paris)
King Willem-Alexander, second right, and Queen Maxima of The Netherlands arrive at a ceremony in honor at all combatants who landed in Arromanches on the 6 June 1944, and liberated Europe, in Arromanches, France, Friday, June 6, 2014. Veterans and Normandy residents are paying tribute to the thousands who gave their lives in the D-Day invasion of Nazi-occupied France 70 years ago. World leaders and dignitaries including President Barack Obama and Queen Elizabeth II will gather to honor the more than 150,000 American, British, Canadian and other Allied D-Day troops who risked and gave their lives to defeat Adolf Hitler's Third Reich. (AP Photo/Claude Paris)
US President Barack Obama, left, and French President Francois Hollande look out over Omaha beach during a joint French-US D-Day commemoration ceremony at the Normandy American Cemetery and Memorial in Colleville-sur-mer, Normandy, France, Friday June 6, 2014, marking the 70th anniversary of the World War II Allied landings in Normandy. (AP PhotoAlain Jocard, pool)
US President Barack Obama, left, and French President Francois Hollande look out over Omaha beach during a joint French-US D-Day commemoration ceremony at the Normandy American Cemetery and Memorial in Colleville-sur-mer, Normandy, France, Friday June 6, 2014, marking the 70th anniversary of the World War II Allied landings in Normandy. (AP Photo/Alain Jocard, pool)
93 year old U.S WWII veteran Jim Martin of the 101st Airborne adjusts his cap after he performed a tandem parachute jump on to Utah Beach, western France ,Thursday June 5, 2014, as part of the commemoration of the 70th anniversary of the D Day. World leaders and veterans prepare to mark the 70th anniversary of the invasion this week in Normandy. (AP PhotoThibault Camus)
93 year old U.S WWII veteran Jim Martin of the 101st Airborne adjusts his cap after he performed a tandem parachute jump on to Utah Beach, western France ,Thursday June 5, 2014, as part of the commemoration of the 70th anniversary of the D Day. World leaders and veterans prepare to mark the 70th anniversary of the invasion this week in Normandy. (AP Photo/Thibault Camus)
This is the scene censors viewed as the two-millionth foot of motion picture film reviewed since D-Day reached the screen at SHAEF film censorship theater and showed U.S. Gen, Dwight D. Eisenhower, Supreme Allied Commander, talking with men of the American Divison D-Day, June 6,1944. (AP Photo)
This is the scene censors viewed as the two-millionth foot of motion picture film reviewed since D-Day reached the screen at SHAEF film censorship theater and showed U.S. Gen, Dwight D. Eisenhower, Supreme Allied Commander, talking with men of the American Divison D-Day, June 6,1944. (AP Photo)
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U.S. reinforcements wade through the surf from a landing craft in the days following D-Day and the Allied invasion of Nazi-occupied France at Normandy in June 1944 during World War II. From the first sketchy German radio broadcast to the distribution of images filmed in color, it has taken decades for the full story of the D-Day invasion to come out. As world leaders and veterans prepare to mark the 70th anniversary of the invasion this week, multiple Twitter hashtags are following the ceremonies minute by minute. At the time, the reporting, filming and taking of photos was neither easy nor straightforward. Photographs by Robert Capa who was embedded with U.S. troops on Omaha Beach, took more than an week for his images to reach American news. (AP PhotoBert Brandt, File)
U.S. reinforcements wade through the surf from a landing craft in the days following D-Day and the Allied invasion of Nazi-occupied France at Normandy in June 1944 during World War II. From the first sketchy German radio broadcast to the distribution of images filmed in color, it has taken decades for the full story of the D-Day invasion to come out. As world leaders and veterans prepare to mark the 70th anniversary of the invasion this week, multiple Twitter hashtags are following the ceremonies minute by minute. At the time, the reporting, filming and taking of photos was neither easy nor straightforward. Photographs by Robert Capa who was embedded with U.S. troops on Omaha Beach, took more than an week for his images to reach American news. (AP Photo/Bert Brandt, File)
In this photo provided by the U.S. Army Signal Corps., these landing craft, loaded with American troops and guarded overhead by barrage balloons, ride the calm waters of the English Channel, waiting opening of assault on fortress Europe along the French northern coast, June 6, 1944. An American flag flies from the stern of one craft in the foreground. (AP PhotoU.S. Army Signal Corps)
In this photo provided by the U.S. Army Signal Corps., these landing craft, loaded with American troops and guarded overhead by barrage balloons, ride the calm waters of the English Channel, waiting opening of assault on fortress Europe along the French northern coast, June 6, 1944. An American flag flies from the stern of one craft in the foreground. (AP Photo/U.S. Army Signal Corps)
In this image provided by the U.S. Army Signal Corps, General Dwight Eisenhower gives the order of the day, Full Victory - Nothing Else, to paratroopers somewhere in England just before they board their planes to participate in the first assault in the invasion of the continent of Europe, June 6, 1944. (AP PhotoU.S. Army Signal Corps Photo)
In this image provided by the U.S. Army Signal Corps, General Dwight Eisenhower gives the order of the day, "Full Victory - Nothing Else," to paratroopers somewhere in England just before they board their planes to participate in the first assault in the invasion of the continent of Europe, June 6, 1944. (AP Photo/U.S. Army Signal Corps Photo)
In this photo provided by the British Navy, wounded British troops from the South Lancashire and Middlesex regiments are being helped ashore at Sword Beach, June 6, 1944, during the D-Day invasion of German occupied France during World War II. (AP PhotoBritish Navy)
In this photo provided by the British Navy, wounded British troops from the South Lancashire and Middlesex regiments are being helped ashore at Sword Beach, June 6, 1944, during the D-Day invasion of German occupied France during World War II. (AP Photo/British Navy)
Men of the American assault troops of the 16th Infantry Regiment, injured while storming a coastal area code-named Omaha Beach during the Allied invasion of the Normandy, wait by the chalk cliffs at Collville-sur-Mer for evacuation to a field hospital for further treatment, June 6, 1944. (AP Photo)
Men of the American assault troops of the 16th Infantry Regiment, injured while storming a coastal area code-named Omaha Beach during the Allied invasion of the Normandy, wait by the chalk cliffs at Collville-sur-Mer for evacuation to a field hospital for further treatment, June 6, 1944. (AP Photo)
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A returning B-24 Liberator of the U.S. Eighth Army Air Force passes over part of the invasion armada as the boats steam across the channel toward the coast of Northern France, on June 6, 1944. (AP Photo)
A returning B-24 Liberator of the U.S. Eighth Army Air Force passes over part of the invasion armada as the boats steam across the channel toward the coast of Northern France, on June 6, 1944. (AP Photo)
In this photo provided by the U.S. Coast Guard, a U.S. Coast Guard landing barge, tightly packed with helmeted soldiers, approaches the shore at Normandy, France, during initial Allied landing operations, June 6, 1944. These barges ride back and forth across the English Channel, bringing wave after wave of reinforcement troops to the Allied beachheads. (AP Photo)
In this photo provided by the U.S. Coast Guard, a U.S. Coast Guard landing barge, tightly packed with helmeted soldiers, approaches the shore at Normandy, France, during initial Allied landing operations, June 6, 1944. These barges ride back and forth across the English Channel, bringing wave after wave of reinforcement troops to the Allied beachheads. (AP Photo)
In Piccadilly Circus crowds of Londoners read the first news of the invasion in the editions of the evening papers, June 6, 1944. (AP Photo)
In Piccadilly Circus crowds of Londoners read the first news of the invasion in the editions of the evening papers, June 6, 1944. (AP Photo)
In this photo provided by the U.S. Army Signal Corps, U.S. paratroopers fix their static lines before a jump before dawn over Normandy on D-Day June 6, 1944, in France. The decision to launch the airborne attack in darkness instead of waiting for first light was probably one of the few Allied missteps on June 6, and there was much to criticize both in the training and equipment given to paratroopers and glider-borne troops of the 82nd and 101st airborne divisions. Improvements were called for after the invasion the hard-won knowledge would be used to advantage later. (AP PhotoU.S. Army Signal Corps)
In this photo provided by the U.S. Army Signal Corps, U.S. paratroopers fix their static lines before a jump before dawn over Normandy on D-Day June 6, 1944, in France. The decision to launch the airborne attack in darkness instead of waiting for first light was probably one of the few Allied missteps on June 6, and there was much to criticize both in the training and equipment given to paratroopers and glider-borne troops of the 82nd and 101st airborne divisions. Improvements were called for after the invasion; the hard-won knowledge would be used to advantage later. (AP Photo/U.S. Army Signal Corps)
A member of the U.S. Navy Medical Corps communicates with his supply center by field telephone from an emergency first aid station set up on one of the French beachheads to treat allied wounded during the initial landings in France on June 6, 1944. The concrete wall which gives shelter to the station was part of the German beach defenses. In the background, U.S. troops of the allied expeditionary force crouch behind a hastily constructed gun emplacement. (AP Photo)
A member of the U.S. Navy Medical Corps communicates with his supply center by field telephone from an emergency first aid station set up on one of the French beachheads to treat allied wounded during the initial landings in France on June 6, 1944. The concrete wall which gives shelter to the station was part of the German beach defenses. In the background, U.S. troops of the allied expeditionary force crouch behind a hastily constructed gun emplacement. (AP Photo)
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Members of an American landing unit help their exhausted comrades ashore during the Normandy invasion, June 6, 1944. The men reached the zone code-named Utah Beach, near Sainte Mere Eglise, on a life raft after their landing craft was hit and sunk by German coastal defenses. (AP PhotoInternational News Photo Pool)
Members of an American landing unit help their exhausted comrades ashore during the Normandy invasion, June 6, 1944. The men reached the zone code-named Utah Beach, near Sainte Mere Eglise, on a life raft after their landing craft was hit and sunk by German coastal defenses. (AP Photo/International News Photo Pool)
Carrying full equipment, American assault troops move onto a beachhead code-named Omaha Beach, on the northern coast of France on June 6, 1944, during the Allied invasion of the Normandy coast. (AP Photo)
Carrying full equipment, American assault troops move onto a beachhead code-named Omaha Beach, on the northern coast of France on June 6, 1944, during the Allied invasion of the Normandy coast. (AP Photo)
FILE - In this June 6, 1944 file picture, some of the first assault troops to hit the Normandy, France beachhead take cover behind enemy obstacles to fire on German forces as others follow the first tanks plunging through the water towards the German-held shore during World War II. (AP Photo)
FILE - In this June 6, 1944 file picture, some of the first assault troops to hit the Normandy, France beachhead take cover behind enemy obstacles to fire on German forces as others follow the first tanks plunging through the water towards the German-held shore during World War II. (AP Photo)
Roger Greene, Associated Press Newsfeature Writer in Washington, D.C., was the first seaborned war correspondent to land on the beach of Normandy in the D-Day invasion, France on June 6, 1944, Greene is seen a few days after the landing. He wore a white patch over his right eye, (childhood accident) and made the landing with a broken left wrist, which he encased in a steel-ribbed leather gauntlet. Greene was shouldering a 65-pound rucksack and his water-proof typewriter when he was dump into the channel off the French coast. But he pressed on to the shore and soon landed in a bomb crater where he promptly wrote his first story. (AP Photo)
Roger Greene, Associated Press Newsfeature Writer in Washington, D.C., was the first seaborned war correspondent to land on the beach of Normandy in the D-Day invasion, France on June 6, 1944, Greene is seen a few days after the landing. He wore a white patch over his right eye, (childhood accident) and made the landing with a broken left wrist, which he encased in a steel-ribbed leather gauntlet. Greene was shouldering a 65-pound rucksack and his water-proof typewriter when he was dump into the channel off the French coast. But he pressed on to the shore and soon landed in a bomb crater where he promptly wrote his first story. (AP Photo)
Sitting in the cover of their foxholes, American soldiers of the Allied Expeditionary Force secure a beachhead during initial landing operations at Normandy, France, June 6, 1944. In the background amphibious tanks and other equipment crowd the beach, while landing craft bring more troops and material ashore. (AP PhotoWeston Haynes)
Sitting in the cover of their foxholes, American soldiers of the Allied Expeditionary Force secure a beachhead during initial landing operations at Normandy, France, June 6, 1944. In the background amphibious tanks and other equipment crowd the beach, while landing craft bring more troops and material ashore. (AP Photo/Weston Haynes)
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German prisoners of war are led away by Allied forces from Utah Beach, on June 6, 1944, during landing operations at the Normandy coast, France. (AP Photo)
German prisoners of war are led away by Allied forces from Utah Beach, on June 6, 1944, during landing operations at the Normandy coast, France. (AP Photo)
Members of a British special service commando are having their kits checked before leaving for the Allied landing operations of the Normandy coast in France, on June 6, 1944. (AP Photo)
Members of a British special service commando are having their kits checked before leaving for the Allied landing operations of the Normandy coast in France, on June 6, 1944. (AP Photo)
Young Field Marshal Erwin Rommel headed group B, on the coast hit by the allied invasion, June 6, 1944 under Von Runstedt. He reviews the crew of a battery on the channel coast. ( AP Photo)
Young Field Marshal Erwin Rommel headed group B, on the coast hit by the allied invasion, June 6, 1944 under Von Runstedt. He reviews the crew of a battery on the channel coast. ( AP Photo)
A French civilian points out the way for an American soldier who landed with the Allied expeditionary force in northern France, on June 6, 1944. (AP Photo)
A French civilian points out the way for an American soldier who landed with the Allied expeditionary force in northern France, on June 6, 1944. (AP Photo)
In this image provided by the U.S. Coast Guard, while under attack of heavy machine gun fire from the German coastal defense forces, these American soldiers wade ashore off the ramp of a U.S. Coast Guard landing craft, during the Allied landing operations at Normandy, France on June 6, 1944. (AP PhotoU.S. Coast Guard)
In this image provided by the U.S. Coast Guard, while under attack of heavy machine gun fire from the German coastal defense forces, these American soldiers wade ashore off the ramp of a U.S. Coast Guard landing craft, during the Allied landing operations at Normandy, France on June 6, 1944. (AP Photo/U.S. Coast Guard)
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Canadian invasion troops stand guard over the first German prisoners captured during the assault on France by Allied forces on June 6, 1944 along a 100 mile front on the Normandy coast between LeHavre and Cherbourg. Wounded soldiers are being treated, in the background. At extreme bear are German coastal fortifications of masonry, silenced by the invaders. (AP Photo)
Canadian invasion troops stand guard over the first German prisoners captured during the assault on France by Allied forces on June 6, 1944 along a 100 mile front on the Normandy coast between LeHavre and Cherbourg. Wounded soldiers are being treated, in the background. At extreme bear are German coastal fortifications of masonry, silenced by the invaders. (AP Photo)
Members of an American armored unit at a Marshalling are somewhere in England on June 6, 1944, are briefed by their commanding officer prior to receiving their D-Day assignments. (AP Photo)
Members of an American armored unit at a Marshalling are "somewhere in England" on June 6, 1944, are briefed by their commanding officer prior to receiving their "D-Day" assignments. (AP Photo)
American Soldiers equiped with full pack and extra allotments of ammunition, march down ian english street to their invasion craft for embarkation on June 6, 1944.(AP Photo)
American Soldiers equiped with full pack and extra allotments of ammunition, march down ian english street to their invasion craft for embarkation on June 6, 1944.(AP Photo)
An American infantryman receives his rations of candy and cigarettes, somewhere in England on June 6, 1944, before embarking with other troops for the assault on the French coast, to open the long-awaited second front invasion. (AP Photo)
An American infantryman receives his rations of candy and cigarettes, somewhere in England on June 6, 1944, before embarking with other troops for the assault on the French coast, to open the long-awaited second front invasion. (AP Photo)
French civilians give a warm welcome to American paratroopers, members of the Allied expeditionary force, which landed in northern France, on June 6, 1944. (AP Photo)
French civilians give a warm welcome to American paratroopers, members of the Allied expeditionary force, which landed in northern France, on June 6, 1944. (AP Photo)
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Landing craft loaded with American troops pass other landing craft lining the dock side while in foreground, other craft take on equipment on June 6, 1944. (AP Photo)
Landing craft loaded with American troops pass other landing craft lining the dock side while in foreground, other craft take on equipment on June 6, 1944. (AP Photo)
American soldiers and supplies arrive on the shore of the French coast of German-occupied Normandy during the Allied D-Day invasion on June 6, 1944 in World War II. (AP Photo)
American soldiers and supplies arrive on the shore of the French coast of German-occupied Normandy during the Allied D-Day invasion on June 6, 1944 in World War II. (AP Photo)
American paratroopers, heavily armed, sit inside a military plane as they soar over the English Channel en route to the Normandy French coast for the Allied D-Day invasion of the German stronghold during World War II, June 6, 1944. (AP Photo)
American paratroopers, heavily armed, sit inside a military plane as they soar over the English Channel en route to the Normandy French coast for the Allied D-Day invasion of the German stronghold during World War II, June 6, 1944. (AP Photo)
British troops make their way through low water and up the beach after leaving landing craft which transported them across the Channel to the Normandy beachhead for D-Day invasion in France, June 6, 1944 in World War II. (AP PhotoOfficial British photo)
British troops make their way through low water and up the beach after leaving landing craft which transported them across the Channel to the Normandy beachhead for D-Day invasion in France, June 6, 1944 in World War II. (AP Photo/Official British photo)
Soldiers of the 2nd Canadian Flotilla are seen as they establish a beachhead code-named Juno Beach, near Bernieres-sur-mer, on the northern coast of France, on June 6, 1944, during the Allied invasion of the Normandy. (AP Photo)
Soldiers of the 2nd Canadian Flotilla are seen as they establish a beachhead code-named Juno Beach, near Bernieres-sur-mer, on the northern coast of France, on June 6, 1944, during the Allied invasion of the Normandy. (AP Photo)
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After landing at the shore, these British troops wait for the signal to move forward, during the initial Allied landing operations in Normandy, France, June 6, 1944. (AP Photo)
After landing at the shore, these British troops wait for the signal to move forward, during the initial Allied landing operations in Normandy, France, June 6, 1944. (AP Photo)
Landing craft loaded for invasion assault LCTs are loaded with half tracks and other armored vehicles by American Troops, at an Embarkation point in England on June 6, 1944 just before they set sail for the D-day invasion of the French coast. (AP Photo)
Landing craft loaded for invasion assault LCT's are loaded with half tracks and other armored vehicles by American Troops, at an Embarkation point in England on June 6, 1944 just before they set sail for the D-day invasion of the French coast. (AP Photo)
A big U.S. army field kitchen is rolled up the open bow of an LST (Landing Ship, Tanks), during loading operations at an English invasion Port on June 6, 1944. (AP Photo)
A big U.S. army field kitchen is rolled up the open bow of an LST (Landing Ship, Tanks), during loading operations at an English invasion Port on June 6, 1944. (AP Photo)
These members of the first groups of assault troops to take part in the Allied invasion of Northern France receive benediction from an Army chaplain before leaving England on June 6, 1944, for the European continent. Their assault craft are in the background. (AP Photo)
These members of the first groups of assault troops to take part in the Allied invasion of Northern France receive benediction from an Army chaplain before leaving England on June 6, 1944, for the European continent. Their assault craft are in the background. (AP Photo)
British Stirling bombers line up on an airfield, somewhere in England, on June 7, 1944, before towing gliders, full of Allied troops, to France as part of the D-Day landings. (AP Photo)
British Stirling bombers line up on an airfield, somewhere in England, on June 7, 1944, before towing gliders, full of Allied troops, to France as part of the D-Day landings. (AP Photo)
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Ducks (amphibious trucks) and a half-track follow foot troops ashore during the invasion of Normandy on a 100-mile front along the French coast by allied forces on June 6, 1944. This was a turning point for the Allies in World War II, known as D-Day. (AP Photo)
Ducks (amphibious trucks) and a half-track follow foot troops ashore during the invasion of Normandy on a 100-mile front along the French coast by allied forces on June 6, 1944. This was a turning point for the Allies in World War II, known as D-Day. (AP Photo)
General Dwight D. Eisenhower gives the order of the day, Full victory - nothing else, to paratroopers somewhere in England, just before they boarded their airplanes to participate in the first assault in the invasion of the continent of Europe, June 6, 1944. (AP PhotoU.S. Army Signal Corps Photo)
General Dwight D. Eisenhower gives the order of the day, "Full victory - nothing else," to paratroopers somewhere in England, just before they boarded their airplanes to participate in the first assault in the invasion of the continent of Europe, June 6, 1944. (AP Photo/U.S. Army Signal Corps Photo)
Canadian troops in landing crafts approach a stretch of coastline code-named Juno Beach, near Bernieres-sur-mer, as the Allied Normandy invasion gets under way, on June 6, 1944. (AP Photo)
Canadian troops in landing crafts approach a stretch of coastline code-named Juno Beach, near Bernieres-sur-mer, as the Allied Normandy invasion gets under way, on June 6, 1944. (AP Photo)
Men and assault vehicles storm the beach as Allied landing craft reach their destination during the initial Normandy landing operations in France, on June 6, 1944. (AP Photo)
Men and assault vehicles storm the beach as Allied landing craft reach their destination during the initial Normandy landing operations in France, on June 6, 1944. (AP Photo)
A U.S. Coast Guard LCI, heavily listing to port, moves alongside a transport ship to evacuate her troops, during the initial Normandy landing operations in France, on June 6, 1944. Moments later the craft will capsize and sink. Note that helmeted infantrymen, with full packs, are all standing to starboard side of the ship. (AP Photo)
A U.S. Coast Guard LCI, heavily listing to port, moves alongside a transport ship to evacuate her troops, during the initial Normandy landing operations in France, on June 6, 1944. Moments later the craft will capsize and sink. Note that helmeted infantrymen, with full packs, are all standing to starboard side of the ship. (AP Photo)
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As the Allied invasion of the Normandy gets underway, American troops are shown as they embark in landing crafts at a British port, on June 6, 1944. (AP PhotoPeter Carroll)
As the Allied invasion of the Normandy gets underway, American troops are shown as they embark in landing crafts at a British port, on June 6, 1944. (AP Photo/Peter Carroll)
Men and supplies are being ferried out to landing crafts enroute for the initial Allied invasion of the Normandy, June 6, 1944. (AP PhotoPeter Carroll)
Men and supplies are being ferried out to landing crafts enroute for the initial Allied invasion of the Normandy, June 6, 1944. (AP Photo/Peter Carroll)
America soldiers, equipped with full pack and extra allotments of ammunition, march down an English street to their invasion craft for embarkation, on June 6, 1944 for their historic second front assault on the french coast. (AP Photo)
America soldiers, equipped with full pack and extra allotments of ammunition, march down an English street to their invasion craft for embarkation, on June 6, 1944 for their historic second front assault on the french coast. (AP Photo)
American troops move over the crest of a hill to the interior of Northern France, June 6, 1944. (AP Photo)
American troops move over the crest of a hill to the interior of Northern France, June 6, 1944. (AP Photo)
In this photo dated May 15, 2014, the Pointe du Hoc is seen from inside a German bunker in Cricqueville en Bessin, in Normandy, France. Andree Auvray, nine months pregnant, was hiding from German bombings in a Normandy ditch with her husband one night in June 1944 when their dogs started barking. The shadows of three soldiers appeared. The soldiers were Americans. D-Day had begun. In an interview with Associated Press, Auvray relives that wrenching time with clarity and a growing sense of urgency. Seventy years have passed since the Allied invasion of Normandy helped turn the tide against Hitler. With their numbers rapidly diminishing, she and other French women and men who owe their freedom to D-Days fighters are more determined than ever to keep alive the memory of the battle and its meaning. (AP PhotoNicolas Garriga)
In this photo dated May 15, 2014, the Pointe du Hoc is seen from inside a German bunker in Cricqueville en Bessin, in Normandy, France. Andree Auvray, nine months pregnant, was hiding from German bombings in a Normandy ditch with her husband one night in June 1944 when their dogs started barking. The shadows of three soldiers appeared. The soldiers were Americans. D-Day had begun. In an interview with Associated Press, Auvray relives that wrenching time with clarity and a growing sense of urgency. Seventy years have passed since the Allied invasion of Normandy helped turn the tide against Hitler. With their numbers rapidly diminishing, she and other French women and men who owe their freedom to D-Day's fighters are more determined than ever to keep alive the memory of the battle and its meaning. (AP Photo/Nicolas Garriga)
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