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In this Aug. 28, 1963, black-and-white file photo Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. addresses marchers during his I Have a Dream speech at the Lincoln Memorial in Washington. (AP PhotoFile)
In this Aug. 28, 1963, black-and-white file photo Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. addresses marchers during his "I Have a Dream" speech at the Lincoln Memorial in Washington. (AP Photo/File)
In this Aug. 28, 1963, file photo shows civil rights demonstrators gather at the Washington Monument grounds before noon, before marching to the Lincoln Memorial, seen in the far background at right, where the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom will end with a speech by Rev. Martin Luther King Jr., now known as the I Have A Dream speech. Next Wednesday, the nations first black president will stand near the spot where King stood 50 years ago, a living symbol of the racial progress King dreamed about, and enunciate where he believes this nation should be headed. (AP Photo, File)
In this Aug. 28, 1963, file photo shows civil rights demonstrators gather at the Washington Monument grounds before noon, before marching to the Lincoln Memorial, seen in the far background at right, where the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom will end with a speech by Rev. Martin Luther King Jr., now known as the "I Have A Dream" speech. Next Wednesday, the nation's first black president will stand near the spot where King stood 50 years ago, a living symbol of the racial progress King dreamed about, and enunciate where he believes this nation should be headed. (AP Photo, File)
In this Aug. 28, 1963, file photo Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., center front, marches for civil rights, arms linked in a line of men, in the March on Washington. It wasnt until the 1960s civil rights movement, exemplified by the historic march, that new laws began strengthening the federal role in civil right protection. Now, the Justice Department is expected to pursue civil rights prosecutions. But in many cases of inflamed racial passions, federal prosecutors dont find the evidence needed to support civil rights charges. (AP Photo, File)
In this Aug. 28, 1963, file photo Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., center front, marches for civil rights, arms linked in a line of men, in the March on Washington. It wasn't until the 1960s civil rights movement, exemplified by the historic march, that new laws began strengthening the federal role in civil right protection. Now, the Justice Department is expected to pursue civil rights prosecutions. But in many cases of inflamed racial passions, federal prosecutors don't find the evidence needed to support civil rights charges. (AP Photo, File)
On Aug. 28, 1963, President John F. Kennedy is seen in the White House with leaders of the civil rights March on Washington. From left Whitney Young Dr. Martin Luther King (1929 - 1968) Rabbi Joachim Prinz A. Philip Randolph President Kennedy Walter Reuther (1907 - 1970) and Roy Wilkins. Behind Reuther is Vice-President Lyndon Johnson. (Photo by Three LionsGetty Images)
On Aug. 28, 1963, President John F. Kennedy is seen in the White House with leaders of the civil rights "March on Washington." From left: Whitney Young; Dr. Martin Luther King (1929 - 1968); Rabbi Joachim Prinz; A. Philip Randolph; President Kennedy; Walter Reuther (1907 - 1970); and Roy Wilkins. Behind Reuther is Vice-President Lyndon Johnson. (Photo by Three Lions/Getty Images)
A woman stands in a crowd and yells, Freedom when asked to yell so loud it will be heard all over the world at the March on Washington, Washington, D.C., Aug. 28, 1963. (Express NewspapersGetty Images)
A woman stands in a crowd and yells, "Freedom!" when asked to yell so loud it will be heard all over the world at the March on Washington, Washington, D.C., Aug. 28, 1963. (Express Newspapers/Getty Images)
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American actor Marlon Brando (1924 - 2004) stands with his arm around poet James Baldwin, surrounded by actors Charlton Heston (L), Harry Belafonte and others gathered at the Lincoln Memorial during the Civil Rights March on Washington, D.C., Aug. 28, 1963. (Hulton ArchiveGetty Images)
American actor Marlon Brando (1924 - 2004) stands with his arm around poet James Baldwin, surrounded by actors Charlton Heston (L), Harry Belafonte and others gathered at the Lincoln Memorial during the Civil Rights March on Washington, D.C., Aug. 28, 1963. (Hulton Archive/Getty Images)
Officers hold back the crowd as a woman is calmed by military police during at the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom, Washington D.C., Aug. 28, 1963. (Photo by Hulton ArchiveGetty Images)
Officers hold back the crowd as a woman is calmed by military police during at the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom, Washington D.C., Aug. 28, 1963. (Photo by Hulton Archive/Getty Images)
To pass the long morning, young women clap and sing along to a freedom song between speeches at the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom in Washington D.C., Aug. 28, 1963. (Express NewspapersGetty Images)
To pass the long morning, young women clap and sing along to a freedom song between speeches at the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom in Washington D.C., Aug. 28, 1963. (Express Newspapers/Getty Images)
Here is an aerial view of the 1963 March on Washington at the Lincoln Memorial with a view of the reflecting pool and the Washington Monument. (AP)
Here is an aerial view of the 1963 March on Washington at the Lincoln Memorial with a view of the reflecting pool and the Washington Monument. (AP)
Here is an aerial view of the 1963 March on Washington at the Lincoln Memorial in Washington. (AP)
Here is an aerial view of the 1963 March on Washington at the Lincoln Memorial in Washington. (AP)
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In this Aug. 28, 1963, file photo Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., center left with arms raised, marches along Constitution Avenue with other civil rights protestors carrying placards, from the Washington Monument to the Lincoln Memorial during the March on Washington. Next Wednesday, the nations first black president, Barack Obama, will stand near the spot where Martin Luther King Jr. stood 50 years ago, a living symbol of the racial progress King dreamed about, and enunciate where he believes this nation should be headed. (AP Photo, File)
In this Aug. 28, 1963, file photo Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., center left with arms raised, marches along Constitution Avenue with other civil rights protestors carrying placards, from the Washington Monument to the Lincoln Memorial during the March on Washington. Next Wednesday, the nation's first black president, Barack Obama, will stand near the spot where Martin Luther King Jr. stood 50 years ago, a living symbol of the racial progress King dreamed about, and enunciate where he believes this nation should be headed. (AP Photo, File)
This Aug. 28, 1963, file photo shows Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. acknowledging the crowd at the Lincoln Memorial for his I Have a Dream speech during the March on Washington. Next Wednesday, the nations first black president will stand near the spot where Martin Luther King Jr. stood 50 years ago, a living symbol of the racial progress King dreamed about, and enunciate where he believes this nation should be headed. (AP PhotoFile)
This Aug. 28, 1963, file photo shows Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. acknowledging the crowd at the Lincoln Memorial for his "I Have a Dream" speech during the March on Washington. Next Wednesday, the nation's first black president will stand near the spot where Martin Luther King Jr. stood 50 years ago, a living symbol of the racial progress King dreamed about, and enunciate where he believes this nation should be headed. (AP Photo/File)
A tourist points to the exact location where Rev. Martin Luther King Jr., gave his famous I Have a Dream speech, at the Lincoln Memorial in Washington, Thursday, Aug. 22, 2013, in Washington. President Barack Obama is scheduled to speak next week at a ceremony on the 50th anniversary of the 1963 March on Washington. (AP PhotoCarolyn Kaster)
A tourist points to the exact location where Rev. Martin Luther King Jr., gave his famous 'I Have a Dream' speech, at the Lincoln Memorial in Washington, Thursday, Aug. 22, 2013, in Washington. President Barack Obama is scheduled to speak next week at a ceremony on the 50th anniversary of the 1963 March on Washington. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)
Tourist gather at the Lincoln Memorial, Thursday, Aug. 22, 2013, in Washington. President Barack Obama is scheduled to speak at a ceremony next week on the 50th anniversary of the 1963 March on Washington. (AP PhotoCarolyn Kaster)
Tourist gather at the Lincoln Memorial, Thursday, Aug. 22, 2013, in Washington. President Barack Obama is scheduled to speak at a ceremony next week on the 50th anniversary of the 1963 March on Washington. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)
The Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial is seen, Thursday, Aug. 22, 2013, in Washington. President Barack Obama is scheduled to speak next week at a ceremony on the 50th anniversary of the 1963 March on Washington. (AP PhotoCarolyn Kaster)
The Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial is seen, Thursday, Aug. 22, 2013, in Washington. President Barack Obama is scheduled to speak next week at a ceremony on the 50th anniversary of the 1963 March on Washington. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)
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In this Aug. 1, 1963 black-and-white photo, Bayard Rustin, leader of the March on Washington speaks at the National Headquarters. Months before Martin Luther King Jr. declared I Have a Dream to galvanize a crowd of thousands, Rustin was planning all the essential details to make the 1963 March on Washington a success. Rustin, who died in 1987, is sometimes forgotten in civil rights history. He had been an outcast. He was a Quaker, a pacifist who opposed the Vietnam war and had flirted with communism. And he was gay. Fifty years later, Rustins legacy is a key part of the march anniversary. Civil rights leaders plan an unprecedented inclusion of gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgender people this month as part of a larger movement calling for equal rights for all. (AP PhotoEddie Adams, File)
In this Aug. 1, 1963 black-and-white photo, Bayard Rustin, leader of the "March on Washington" speaks at the National Headquarters. Months before Martin Luther King Jr. declared "I Have a Dream" to galvanize a crowd of thousands, Rustin was planning all the essential details to make the 1963 March on Washington a success. Rustin, who died in 1987, is sometimes forgotten in civil rights history. He had been an outcast. He was a Quaker, a pacifist who opposed the Vietnam war and had flirted with communism. And he was gay. Fifty years later, Rustin's legacy is a key part of the march anniversary. Civil rights leaders plan an unprecedented inclusion of gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgender people this month as part of a larger movement calling for equal rights for all. (AP Photo/Eddie Adams, File)
In this August 24, 1963, file photo Bayard Rustin points to a map showing the path of the March on Washington during a news conference at the New York City headquarters. Months before Martin Luther King Jr.s I Have a Dream declaration galvanized a quarter-million people at the 1963 March on Washington, Rustin was planning all the essential details to keep the crowd orderly and engaged. A Quaker, and a pacifist, Rustin served as chief strategist for Kings march over the objections of some leaders, but was kept mostly in the background with some organizers considering him a liability. Notably, he was gay in an era when same-sex relations were widely reviled in American society. He died in 1987, and is sometimes forgotten in civil rights history. (AP Photo, File)
In this August 24, 1963, file photo Bayard Rustin points to a map showing the path of the March on Washington during a news conference at the New York City headquarters. Months before Martin Luther King Jr.'s "I Have a Dream" declaration galvanized a quarter-million people at the 1963 March on Washington, Rustin was planning all the essential details to keep the crowd orderly and engaged. A Quaker, and a pacifist, Rustin served as chief strategist for King's march over the objections of some leaders, but was kept mostly in the background with some organizers considering him a liability. Notably, he was gay in an era when same-sex relations were widely reviled in American society. He died in 1987, and is sometimes forgotten in civil rights history. (AP Photo, File)
In this April 1969 file photo civil rights leader Bayard Rustin is shown in his Park Avenue South office in New York City. Months before Martin Luther King Jr.s I Have a Dream declaration galvanized a quarter-million people at the 1963 March on Washington, Rustin was planning all the essential details to keep the crowd orderly and engaged. A Quaker, and a pacifist, Rustin served as chief strategist for Kings march over the objections of some leaders, but was kept mostly in the background with some organizers considering him a liability. Notably, he was gay in an era when same-sex relations were widely reviled in American society. He died in 1987, and is sometimes forgotten in civil rights history. (AP PhotoA. Camerano)
In this April 1969 file photo civil rights leader Bayard Rustin is shown in his Park Avenue South office in New York City. Months before Martin Luther King Jr.'s "I Have a Dream" declaration galvanized a quarter-million people at the 1963 March on Washington, Rustin was planning all the essential details to keep the crowd orderly and engaged. A Quaker, and a pacifist, Rustin served as chief strategist for King's march over the objections of some leaders, but was kept mostly in the background with some organizers considering him a liability. Notably, he was gay in an era when same-sex relations were widely reviled in American society. He died in 1987, and is sometimes forgotten in civil rights history. (AP Photo/A. Camerano)
Rev. Bobby Turner or Columbus, Ohio, places his hand on the Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial, Thursday, Aug. 22, 2013, in Washington. President Barack Obama is scheduled to speak at a ceremony on the 50th anniversary of the 1963 March on Washington. (AP PhotoCarolyn Kaster)
Rev. Bobby Turner or Columbus, Ohio, places his hand on the Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial, Thursday, Aug. 22, 2013, in Washington. President Barack Obama is scheduled to speak at a ceremony on the 50th anniversary of the 1963 March on Washington. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)
On July 7, 1963, civil right leaders meet at the Roosevelt Hotel in New York to discuss civil right march on Washington, D.C. From left John Lewis, Whitney Young, A. Philp Randolph, Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., James Farmer, and Roy Wilkins. (AP)
On July 7, 1963, civil right leaders meet at the Roosevelt Hotel in New York to discuss civil right march on Washington, D.C. From left: John Lewis, Whitney Young, A. Philp Randolph, Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., James Farmer, and Roy Wilkins. (AP)
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