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In this Tuesday Feb. 23, 2010 photo released by the Xinhua news agency, American-born panda Tai Shan eats bamboo in Wolong Nature Reserve in southwest Chinas Sichuan province. Tai Shan, Xinhua said, is adapting well to life in his new home in southwest Chinas Sichuan province after returning to China. The panda will begin to receive visitors on March 5 after one-month quarantine. (AP PhotoXinhua, Chen Xie)
In this Tuesday Feb. 23, 2010 photo released by the Xinhua news agency, American-born panda Tai Shan eats bamboo in Wolong Nature Reserve in southwest China's Sichuan province. Tai Shan, Xinhua said, is adapting well to life in his new home in southwest China's Sichuan province after returning to China. The panda will begin to receive visitors on March 5 after one-month quarantine. (AP Photo/Xinhua, Chen Xie)
In this Tuesday Feb. 23, 2010 photo released by the Xinhua news agency, American-born panda Tai Shan eats bamboo in Wolong Nature Reserve in southwest Chinas Sichuan province. Tai Shan, Xinhua said, is adapting well to life in his new home in southwest Chinas Sichuan province after returning to China. The panda will begin to receive visitors on March 5 after one-month quarantine. (AP PhotoXinhua, Chen Xie)
In this Tuesday Feb. 23, 2010 photo released by the Xinhua news agency, American-born panda Tai Shan eats bamboo in Wolong Nature Reserve in southwest China's Sichuan province. Tai Shan, Xinhua said, is adapting well to life in his new home in southwest China's Sichuan province after returning to China. The panda will begin to receive visitors on March 5 after one-month quarantine. (AP Photo/Xinhua, Chen Xie)
Visitors look at the American-born panda Tai Shan walk at the Yaan Bifeng Gorge Breeding Base in Sichuan province, China, Tuesday, March 9, 2010. Freed from quarantine, Tai Shan paced around his new home in southwest China as he was put on public display Tuesday for the first time since his much-anticipated arrival in the country. (AP Photo)
Visitors look at the American-born panda Tai Shan walk at the Ya'an Bifeng Gorge Breeding Base in Sichuan province, China, Tuesday, March 9, 2010. Freed from quarantine, Tai Shan paced around his new home in southwest China as he was put on public display Tuesday for the first time since his much-anticipated arrival in the country. (AP Photo)
Visitors look at the American-born panda Tai Shan at the Yaan Bifeng Gorge Breeding Base in Sichuan province, China, Tuesday, March 9, 2010. Freed from quarantine, Tai Shan paced around his new home in southwest China as he was put on public display Tuesday for the first time since his much-anticipated arrival in the country. (AP Photo)
Visitors look at the American-born panda Tai Shan at the Ya'an Bifeng Gorge Breeding Base in Sichuan province, China, Tuesday, March 9, 2010. Freed from quarantine, Tai Shan paced around his new home in southwest China as he was put on public display Tuesday for the first time since his much-anticipated arrival in the country. (AP Photo)
Visitors look at the American-born panda Tai Shan as it walks in the Yaan Bifeng Gorge Breeding Base in Sichuan province, China, Tuesday, March 9, 2010. Freed from quarantine, Tai Shan paced around his new home in southwest China as he was put on public display Tuesday for the first time since his much-anticipated arrival in the country. (AP Photo)
Visitors look at the American-born panda Tai Shan as it walks in the Ya'an Bifeng Gorge Breeding Base in Sichuan province, China, Tuesday, March 9, 2010. Freed from quarantine, Tai Shan paced around his new home in southwest China as he was put on public display Tuesday for the first time since his much-anticipated arrival in the country. (AP Photo)
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Tai Shans keepers and others at the National Zoo cried as the giant panda left the zoo. (WTOP PhotoKristi King)
Tai Shan's keepers and others at the National Zoo cried as the giant panda left the zoo. (WTOP Photo/Kristi King)
Tai Shans trip to China will take nearly 15 hours. (WTOP PhotoKristi King)
Tai Shan's trip to China will take nearly 15 hours. (WTOP Photo/Kristi King)
FedEx donated its services to transport Tai Shan. (WTOP PhotoKristi King)
FedEx donated its services to transport Tai Shan. (WTOP Photo/Kristi King)
A crew loads up Tai Shans supplies on Feb. 4, 2010. (WTOP PhotoKristi King)
A crew loads up Tai Shan's supplies on Feb. 4, 2010. (WTOP Photo/Kristi King)
You have to wonder how much it would cost to check this bag. Inside, it has 55 pounds of bamboo for Tai Shan, pears, apples, sweet potatoes, vet supplies and the luggage of the panda keeper and vet. (WTOP PhotoKristi King)
You have to wonder how much it would cost to check this bag. Inside, it has 55 pounds of bamboo for Tai Shan, pears, apples, sweet potatoes, vet supplies and the luggage of the panda keeper and vet. (WTOP Photo/Kristi King)
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Panda Tai Shan, 4, is seen in his enclosure on his last day at the National Zoo in Washington, on Wednesday, Feb. 3, 2010. Tai Shan, who was born at the zoo in 2005, will be sent to China on Thursday to become part of a breeding program. Under the Smithsonians panda loan agreement, any cub born at the zoo must be returned to China for breeding. (AP PhotoJacquelyn Martin)
Panda Tai Shan, 4, is seen in his enclosure on his last day at the National Zoo in Washington, on Wednesday, Feb. 3, 2010. Tai Shan, who was born at the zoo in 2005, will be sent to China on Thursday to become part of a breeding program. Under the Smithsonian's panda loan agreement, any cub born at the zoo must be returned to China for breeding. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)
Panda fans say goodbye to 4-year-old panda Tai Shan on his last day at the National Zoo in Washington, on Wednesday, Feb. 3, 2010. Tai Shan, who was born at the zoo in 2005, will be sent to China on Thursday to become part of a breeding program. Under the Smithsonians panda loan agreement, any cub born at the zoo must be returned to China for breeding. (AP PhotoJacquelyn Martin)
Panda fans say goodbye to 4-year-old panda Tai Shan on his last day at the National Zoo in Washington, on Wednesday, Feb. 3, 2010. Tai Shan, who was born at the zoo in 2005, will be sent to China on Thursday to become part of a breeding program. Under the Smithsonian's panda loan agreement, any cub born at the zoo must be returned to China for breeding. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)
Mei Xiang, mother of 4-year-old panda Tai Shan, rolls herself down a snowy hill on Tai Shans last day at the National Zoo in Washington, on Wednesday, Feb. 3, 2010. Tai Shan, who was born at the zoo in 2005, will be sent to China on Thursday to become part of a breeding program. Under the Smithsonians panda loan agreement, any cub born at the zoo must be returned to China for breeding. (AP PhotoJacquelyn Martin)
Mei Xiang, mother of 4-year-old panda Tai Shan, rolls herself down a snowy hill on Tai Shan's last day at the National Zoo in Washington, on Wednesday, Feb. 3, 2010. Tai Shan, who was born at the zoo in 2005, will be sent to China on Thursday to become part of a breeding program. Under the Smithsonian's panda loan agreement, any cub born at the zoo must be returned to China for breeding. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)
Panda Tai Shan, 4, is seen on his last day at the National Zoo in Washington, on Wednesday, Feb. 3, 2010. Tai Shan, who was born at the zoo in 2005, will be sent to China on Thursday to become part of a breeding program. Under the Smithsonians panda loan agreement, any cub born at the zoo must be returned to China for breeding. (AP PhotoJacquelyn Martin)
Panda Tai Shan, 4, is seen on his last day at the National Zoo in Washington, on Wednesday, Feb. 3, 2010. Tai Shan, who was born at the zoo in 2005, will be sent to China on Thursday to become part of a breeding program. Under the Smithsonian's panda loan agreement, any cub born at the zoo must be returned to China for breeding. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)
4-year-old panda Tai Shan is seen on his last day at the National Zoo in Washington, on Wednesday, Feb. 3, 2010. Tai Shan, who was born at the zoo in 2005, will be sent to China on Thursday to become part of a breeding program. Under the Smithsonians panda loan agreement, any cub born at the zoo must be returned to China for breeding. (AP PhotoJacquelyn Martin)
4-year-old panda Tai Shan is seen on his last day at the National Zoo in Washington, on Wednesday, Feb. 3, 2010. Tai Shan, who was born at the zoo in 2005, will be sent to China on Thursday to become part of a breeding program. Under the Smithsonian's panda loan agreement, any cub born at the zoo must be returned to China for breeding. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)
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Tai Shan, a giant panda at a the National Zoo, reaches for an apple on his farewell celebratory frozen cake in Washington, D.C., Saturday, Jan. 30, 2010. The 4-year-old panda will be sent to China on Thursday to become part of a breeding program. His last day on public view is Wednesday. (AP PhotoAnn Heisenfelt)
Tai Shan, a giant panda at a the National Zoo, reaches for an apple on his farewell celebratory frozen cake in Washington, D.C., Saturday, Jan. 30, 2010. The 4-year-old panda will be sent to China on Thursday to become part of a breeding program. His last day on public view is Wednesday. (AP Photo/Ann Heisenfelt)
Tai Shan, a giant panda at a the National Zoo, reaches for the apple on his celebratory cake in Washington, D.C., Saturday, Jan. 30, 2010. The treat was part of the Zoos farewell celebration for Tai Shan, who is scheduled to leave for China on Feb. 4. (AP PhotoAnn Heisenfelt)
Tai Shan, a giant panda at a the National Zoo, reaches for the apple on his celebratory cake in Washington, D.C., Saturday, Jan. 30, 2010. The treat was part of the Zoo's farewell celebration for Tai Shan, who is scheduled to leave for China on Feb. 4. (AP Photo/Ann Heisenfelt)
Isabella Lopez, 8, of Hanover, Md., clutches her stuffed giant panda as she enters the National Zoo in Washington, D.C., Saturday, Jan. 30, 2010. 50 stuffed giant pandas were given away to children 12 and under as part of the farewell celebration for giant panda Tai Shan who is scheduled to leave for China on Feb. 4. (AP PhotoAnn Heisenfelt)
Isabella Lopez, 8, of Hanover, Md., clutches her stuffed giant panda as she enters the National Zoo in Washington, D.C., Saturday, Jan. 30, 2010. 50 stuffed giant pandas were given away to children 12 and under as part of the farewell celebration for giant panda Tai Shan who is scheduled to leave for China on Feb. 4. (AP Photo/Ann Heisenfelt)
Linden Ferrell, left takes a picture of two panda mascots as Catherine Wang, right, laughs, at the National Zoo in Washington, D.C., Saturday, Jan. 30, 2010. The two girls were at the Zoo to take part in the farewell celebration for giant panda Tai Shan who is scheduled to leave for China Feb. 4. (AP PhotoAnn Heisenfelt)
Linden Ferrell, left takes a picture of two panda mascots as Catherine Wang, right, laughs, at the National Zoo in Washington, D.C., Saturday, Jan. 30, 2010. The two girls were at the Zoo to take part in the farewell celebration for giant panda Tai Shan who is scheduled to leave for China Feb. 4. (AP Photo/Ann Heisenfelt)
Tess Yilu Golabek, 5, of Springfield, Va., left, takes part in the chrysanthemum dance as part of a farewell celebration for giant panda Tai Shan at the National Zoo in Washington, D.C., Saturday, Jan. 30, 2010. Tai Shan is scheduled to leave for China Feb. 4. (AP PhotoAnn Heisenfelt)
Tess Yilu Golabek, 5, of Springfield, Va., left, takes part in the "chrysanthemum dance" as part of a farewell celebration for giant panda Tai Shan at the National Zoo in Washington, D.C., Saturday, Jan. 30, 2010. Tai Shan is scheduled to leave for China Feb. 4. (AP Photo/Ann Heisenfelt)
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Two visitors at the National Zoo push through the bamboo near the giant panda compound to try to get a view of Tai Shan in Washington, D.C., Saturday, Jan. 30, 2010. Tai Shan is scheduled to leave for China on Feb. 4. (AP PhotoAnn Heisenfelt)
Two visitors at the National Zoo push through the bamboo near the giant panda compound to try to get a view of Tai Shan in Washington, D.C., Saturday, Jan. 30, 2010. Tai Shan is scheduled to leave for China on Feb. 4. (AP Photo/Ann Heisenfelt)
Tai Shan, a giant panda at a the National Zoo, cleans snow off the pad of his paw in Washington, Saturday, Jan. 30, 2010. The 4-year-old panda will be sent to China on Thursday to become part of a breeding program. His last day on public view is Wednesday. (AP PhotoAnn Heisenfelt)
Tai Shan, a giant panda at a the National Zoo, cleans snow off the pad of his paw in Washington, Saturday, Jan. 30, 2010. The 4-year-old panda will be sent to China on Thursday to become part of a breeding program. His last day on public view is Wednesday. (AP Photo/Ann Heisenfelt)
Tai Shan plays in the snow at the National Zoo during his goodbye party on Saturday, Jan. 30, 2010. (WTOP Photo)
Tai Shan plays in the snow at the National Zoo during his goodbye party on Saturday, Jan. 30, 2010. (WTOP Photo)
Tai Shan plays in the snow at the National Zoo during his goodbye party on Saturday, Jan. 30, 2010. (WTOP Photo)
Tai Shan plays in the snow at the National Zoo during his goodbye party on Saturday, Jan. 30, 2010. (WTOP Photo)
In this photo released by the National Zoo in Washington, Tai Shan, a giant panda, is seen at the National Zoos third annual winter celebration, in Washington. The Fujifilm Giant Panda Habitat is open for ZooLights, so visitors can see Tai Shan before he departs for China in early 2010. (AP PhotoNational Zoo, Mehgan Murphy) NO SALES
In this photo released by the National Zoo in Washington, Tai Shan, a giant panda, is seen at the National Zoo's third annual winter celebration, in Washington. The Fujifilm Giant Panda Habitat is open for ZooLights, so visitors can see Tai Shan before he departs for China in early 2010. (AP Photo/National Zoo, Mehgan Murphy) NO SALES
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Following along. (Photo courtesy of Rachel Prince)
Following along. (Photo courtesy of Rachel Prince)
Millions of people have come to the zoo to see Tai Shan since his debut in December 2005. (WTOP PhotoKristi King)
Millions of people have come to the zoo to see Tai Shan since his debut in December 2005. (WTOP Photo/Kristi King)
The National Zoo says it is expected that Tai Shan will enter the breeding program in China, where he will contribute to species conservation. (WTOP PhotoKristi King)
The National Zoo says it is expected that Tai Shan will enter the breeding program in China, where he will contribute to species conservation. (WTOP Photo/Kristi King)
Tai Shan is being trained to enter and calmly remain in a specially designed crate for the flight to China. (WTOP PhotoKristi King)
Tai Shan is being trained to enter and calmly remain in a specially designed crate for the flight to China. (WTOP Photo/Kristi King)
A reporter for a TV station in Hong Kong gets ready for her report on the famous panda. (WTOP PhotoKristi King)
A reporter for a TV station in Hong Kong gets ready for her report on the famous panda. (WTOP Photo/Kristi King)
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Media try to get a great shot of Tai Shan, Friday, Dec. 4, 2009. (WTOP PhotoKristi King)
Media try to get a great shot of Tai Shan, Friday, Dec. 4, 2009. (WTOP Photo/Kristi King)
Tai Shan is seen in the lens of a TV camera. Crews from around the world attended Fridays news conference. (WTOP PhotoKristi King)
Tai Shan is seen in the lens of a TV camera. Crews from around the world attended Friday's news conference. (WTOP Photo/Kristi King)
Tai Shan is seen in December 2007. (Photo courtesy of Tom W.)
Tai Shan is seen in December 2007. (Photo courtesy of Tom W.)
Tai Shan and mom Mei Xiang play in the snow. (Photo courtesy of Kim Navarre)
Tai Shan and mom Mei Xiang play in the snow. (Photo courtesy of Kim Navarre)
Tai Shan is seen in 2006. (Photo courtesy of Deborah Rinn Critzer)
Tai Shan is seen in 2006. (Photo courtesy of Deborah Rinn Critzer)
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Remember when Tai Shan was this big (Photo courtesy of Bob Weiss)
Remember when Tai Shan was this big? (Photo courtesy of Bob Weiss)
Tai Shan was 8 or 9 months old in this picture, and looked like he was daydreaming. (Photo courtesy of Judi)
Tai Shan was 8 or 9 months old in this picture, and looked like he was daydreaming. (Photo courtesy of Judi)
Tai Shan (Photo courtesy of Cathy Gregor)
Tai Shan (Photo courtesy of Cathy Gregor)
Giant panda Tai Shan turned 4. Negotiations are underway to keep Tai Shan and parents, Mei Xiang and Tian Tian, longer. Theyre on loan from the China Wildlife and Conservation Association. (WTOP PhotoMichael Ono)
Giant panda Tai Shan turned 4. Negotiations are underway to keep Tai Shan and parents, Mei Xiang and Tian Tian, longer. They're on loan from the China Wildlife and Conservation Association. (WTOP Photo/Michael Ono)
Tai Shan saunters out for a little birthday cake on July 9, 2009. The cake is made of water, bamboo, shredded beets, and beet juice. (WTOP PhotoMichael Ono)
Tai Shan saunters out for a little birthday cake on July 9, 2009. The cake is made of water, bamboo, shredded beets, and beet juice. (WTOP Photo/Michael Ono)
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Tai Shan turned 4 July 9, 2009. The National Zoo held a party for the giant panda. (WTOP PhotoMichael Ono)
Tai Shan turned 4 July 9, 2009. The National Zoo held a party for the giant panda. (WTOP Photo/Michael Ono)
Tai Shan, the two-and-a-half-year-old giant panda at the Smithsonians National Zoo seen in this photograph taken on Sept. 12, 2007, underwent his first-ever comprehensive physical exam today, Jan. 28. Veterinarians say Tai Shan is in excellent health. (Photo courtesy of the National Zoo)
Tai Shan, the two-and-a-half-year-old giant panda at the Smithsonian's National Zoo seen in this photograph taken on Sept. 12, 2007, underwent his first-ever comprehensive physical exam today, Jan. 28. Veterinarians say Tai Shan is in excellent health. (Photo courtesy of the National Zoo)
Tai Shan, the National Zoos popular giant panda cub, munches on bamboo in Washington on Tuesday, April 24, 2007. Chinese officials granted the cub an extended visa on Tuesday to stay at the U.S. zoo for two more years. (AP PhotoJacquelyn Martin)
Tai Shan, the National Zoo's popular giant panda cub, munches on bamboo in Washington on Tuesday, April 24, 2007. Chinese officials granted the cub an extended "visa" on Tuesday to stay at the U.S. zoo for two more years. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)
Tai Shan, the National Zoos popular giant panda cub, looks up from eating in Washington, Tuesday, April 24, 2007. Chinese officials granted the cub an extended visa on Tuesday to stay at the U.S. zoo for two more years. (AP PhotoJacquelyn Martin)
Tai Shan, the National Zoo's popular giant panda cub, looks up from eating in Washington, Tuesday, April 24, 2007. Chinese officials granted the cub an extended "visa" on Tuesday to stay at the U.S. zoo for two more years. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)
Tai Shan, the National Zoos popular giant panda cub, munches on bamboo in Washington, Tuesday, April 24, 2007. Chinese officials granted the cub an extended visa on Tuesday to stay at the U.S. zoo for two more years. (AP PhotoJacquelyn Martin)
Tai Shan, the National Zoo's popular giant panda cub, munches on bamboo in Washington, Tuesday, April 24, 2007. Chinese officials granted the cub an extended "visa" on Tuesday to stay at the U.S. zoo for two more years. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)
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Tai Shan (bottom), the giant panda cub at the Fujifilm Giant Panda Habitat at the Smithsonians National Zoo, played with his mother, Mei Xiang, today, Jan. 22 in this years first snow for Washington D.C. They spent the first few hours of the morning wrestling and rolling around before settling down for a midday nap. (Photo courtesy of the National Zoo)
Tai Shan (bottom), the giant panda cub at the Fujifilm Giant Panda Habitat at the Smithsonian's National Zoo, played with his mother, Mei Xiang, today, Jan. 22 in this year's first snow for Washington D.C. They spent the first few hours of the morning wrestling and rolling around before settling down for a midday nap. (Photo courtesy of the National Zoo)
Panda cub Tai Shan climbs a tree at the National Zoos new Asia Trail exhibit on Wednesday, Oct. 11, 2006, in Washington. The 53 million renovation of nearly six acres about doubles the space for the zoos three pandas and gives room for a few of their competitors, such as sloth bears and the newly arrived clouded leopards. It also gives visitors, who in the past were kept at a distance, a much closer look at the animals. (AP PhotoKevin Wolf)
Panda cub Tai Shan climbs a tree at the National Zoo's new Asia Trail exhibit on Wednesday, Oct. 11, 2006, in Washington. The $53 million renovation of nearly six acres about doubles the space for the zoo's three pandas and gives room for a few of their competitors, such as sloth bears and the newly arrived clouded leopards. It also gives visitors, who in the past were kept at a distance, a much closer look at the animals. (AP Photo/Kevin Wolf)
Tai Shan digs into a special frozen treat he received on his first birthday, July 9, 2006. His mother Mei Xiang looks on before joining him. The frozen treat, prepared by National Zoo nutritionists, was made of bamboo leaves, carrots, pears, beets, apples and a touch of apple juice suspended in ice. (National ZooAnn Batdorf)
Tai Shan digs into a special frozen treat he received on his first birthday, July 9, 2006. His mother Mei Xiang looks on before joining him. The frozen treat, prepared by National Zoo nutritionists, was made of bamboo leaves, carrots, pears, beets, apples and a touch of apple juice suspended in ice. (National Zoo/Ann Batdorf)
Tai Shan shares a special frozen treat he received on his first birthday, July 9, 2006, with his mother Mei Xiang. Thousands of visitors came to the Zoo to celebrate the cubs birthday, where he also received a new ball and pool from Fujifilm. (National ZooAnn Batdorf)
Tai Shan shares a special frozen treat he received on his first birthday, July 9, 2006, with his mother Mei Xiang. Thousands of visitors came to the Zoo to celebrate the cub's birthday, where he also received a new ball and pool from Fujifilm. (National Zoo/Ann Batdorf)
Tai Shan explores a new pool he received from Fujifilm on his first birthday, July 9, 2006. (National ZooAnn Batdorf)
Tai Shan explores a new pool he received from Fujifilm on his first birthday, July 9, 2006. (National Zoo/Ann Batdorf)
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Tai Shan, the 8-month-old giant panda cub at the Smithsonians National Zoo, enjoys a stalk of bamboo on Saturday, March 25. Adult giant pandas eat up to 40 lbs. of bamboo each day. (Photo courtesy of the National Zoo)
Tai Shan, the 8-month-old giant panda cub at the Smithsonian's National Zoo, enjoys a stalk of bamboo on Saturday, March 25. Adult giant pandas eat up to 40 lbs. of bamboo each day. (Photo courtesy of the National Zoo)
Tai Shan, the 8-month-old giant panda cub at the Smithsonians National Zoo, enjoys a stalk of bamboo on Saturday, March 25. The cub weighs 40 lbs. and although he has been chewing on bamboo for a few months, he has only recently started eating it. (Photo courtesy of the National Zoo)
Tai Shan, the 8-month-old giant panda cub at the Smithsonian's National Zoo, enjoys a stalk of bamboo on Saturday, March 25. The cub weighs 40 lbs. and although he has been chewing on bamboo for a few months, he has only recently started eating it. (Photo courtesy of the National Zoo)
Tai Shan, the 7-month-old giant panda cub at the Smithsonians National Zoo, jumps on his mothers back on Sunday, Feb. 12. This was the cubs first time playing in the snow and they both enjoyed wrestling and rolling around.(Smithsonians National Zoo PhotoAnn Batdorf)
Tai Shan, the 7-month-old giant panda cub at the Smithsonian's National Zoo, jumps on his mother's back on Sunday, Feb. 12. This was the cub's first time playing in the snow and they both enjoyed wrestling and rolling around.(Smithsonian's National Zoo Photo/Ann Batdorf)
Tai Shan, the 7-month-old giant panda cub at the Smithsonians National Zoo, romps in the snow with his mother, Mei Xiang, on Sunday, Feb. 12. This was the cubs first time playing in the snow and they both enjoyed wrestling and rolling around. The cub and his parents live at the National Zoos Fujifilm Giant Panda Habitat. (Smithsonians National Zoo PhotoAnn Batdorf)
Tai Shan, the 7-month-old giant panda cub at the Smithsonian's National Zoo, romps in the snow with his mother, Mei Xiang, on Sunday, Feb. 12. This was the cub's first time playing in the snow and they both enjoyed wrestling and rolling around. The cub and his parents live at the National Zoo's Fujifilm Giant Panda Habitat. (Smithsonian's National Zoo Photo/Ann Batdorf)
Tai Shan wrestles with his mother, Mei Xiang, in the snow on Sunday, Feb. 12. (Smithsonians National Zoo PhotoAnn Batdorf)
Tai Shan wrestles with his mother, Mei Xiang, in the snow on Sunday, Feb. 12. (Smithsonian's National Zoo Photo/Ann Batdorf)
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Tai Shan, the 7-month-old giant panda cub at the Smithsonians National Zoo, nips at his mothers cheek on Sunday, Feb. 12. (Smithsonians National Zoo PhotoAnn Batdorf)
Tai Shan, the 7-month-old giant panda cub at the Smithsonian's National Zoo, nips at his mother's cheek on Sunday, Feb. 12. (Smithsonian's National Zoo Photo/Ann Batdorf)
In this photo taken Saturday, Jan. 7, 2006, and released Monday, Jan. 9, 2006, by the Smithsonian National Zoo, Tai Shan, the giant panda cub at the Smithsonians National Zoo, turns 6-months-old Monday. The 27-lb. cub spends most mornings exploring his outdoor yard, but is captivated by his indoor toys as well. (AP PhotoSmithsonian National Zoo, Ann Batdorf)
In this photo taken Saturday, Jan. 7, 2006, and released Monday, Jan. 9, 2006, by the Smithsonian National Zoo, Tai Shan, the giant panda cub at the Smithsonian's National Zoo, turns 6-months-old Monday. The 27-lb. cub spends most mornings exploring his outdoor yard, but is captivated by his indoor toys as well. (AP Photo/Smithsonian National Zoo, Ann Batdorf)
Tai Shan, the giant panda cub at the Smithsonians National Zoo, ventured outside for the first time this morning, Dec. 22, under the close eye of his mother, Mei Xiang. National Zoo staff also watched closely as the 5-month-old cub explored his outdoor exhibit yard, climbed on fallen trees and wrestled with his mother. Tai Shan and his parents live at the National Zoos Fujifilm Giant Panda Habitat. (PhotoJessie Cohen, Smithsonians National Zoo)
Tai Shan, the giant panda cub at the Smithsonian's National Zoo, ventured outside for the first time this morning, Dec. 22, under the close eye of his mother, Mei Xiang. National Zoo staff also watched closely as the 5-month-old cub explored his outdoor exhibit yard, climbed on fallen trees and wrestled with his mother. Tai Shan and his parents live at the National Zoo's Fujifilm Giant Panda Habitat. (Photo/Jessie Cohen, Smithsonian's National Zoo)
Tai Shan, the giant panda cub at the Smithsonians National Zoo, ventured outside for the first time this morning, Dec. 22, under the close eye of his mother, Mei Xiang. National Zoo staff also watched closely as the 5-month-old cub explored his outdoor exhibit yard, climbed on fallen trees and wrestled with his mother. Tai Shan and his parents live at the National Zoos Fujifilm Giant Panda Habitat. (PhotoJessie Cohen, Smithsonians National Zoo)
Tai Shan, the giant panda cub at the Smithsonian's National Zoo, ventured outside for the first time this morning, Dec. 22, under the close eye of his mother, Mei Xiang. National Zoo staff also watched closely as the 5-month-old cub explored his outdoor exhibit yard, climbed on fallen trees and wrestled with his mother. Tai Shan and his parents live at the National Zoo's Fujifilm Giant Panda Habitat. (Photo/Jessie Cohen, Smithsonian's National Zoo)
Tai Shan, the giant panda cub at the Smithsonians National Zoo, ventured outside for the first time this morning, Dec. 22, under the close eye of his mother, Mei Xiang. National Zoo staff also watched closely as the 5-month-old cub explored his outdoor exhibit yard, climbed on fallen trees and wrestled with his mother. Tai Shan and his parents live at the National Zoos Fujifilm Giant Panda Habitat. (PhotoJessie Cohen, Smithsonians National Zoo)
Tai Shan, the giant panda cub at the Smithsonian's National Zoo, ventured outside for the first time this morning, Dec. 22, under the close eye of his mother, Mei Xiang. National Zoo staff also watched closely as the 5-month-old cub explored his outdoor exhibit yard, climbed on fallen trees and wrestled with his mother. Tai Shan and his parents live at the National Zoo's Fujifilm Giant Panda Habitat. (Photo/Jessie Cohen, Smithsonian's National Zoo)
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Tai Shan, the giant panda cub at the Smithsonians National Zoo, ventured outside for the first time this morning, Dec. 22, under the close eye of his mother, Mei Xiang. National Zoo staff also watched closely as the 5-month-old cub explored his outdoor exhibit yard, climbed on fallen trees and wrestled with his mother. Tai Shan and his parents live at the National Zoos Fujifilm Giant Panda Habitat. (PhotoJessie Cohen,Smithsonians National Zoo)
Tai Shan, the giant panda cub at the Smithsonian's National Zoo, ventured outside for the first time this morning, Dec. 22, under the close eye of his mother, Mei Xiang. National Zoo staff also watched closely as the 5-month-old cub explored his outdoor exhibit yard, climbed on fallen trees and wrestled with his mother. Tai Shan and his parents live at the National Zoo's Fujifilm Giant Panda Habitat. (Photo/Jessie Cohen,Smithsonian's National Zoo)
Tai Shan, the giant panda cub at the Smithsonians National Zoo, ventured outside for the first time this morning, Dec. 22, under the close eye of his mother, Mei Xiang. National Zoo staff also watched closely as the 5-month-old cub explored his outdoor exhibit yard, climbed on fallen trees and wrestled with his mother. Tai Shan and his parents live at the National Zoos Fujifilm Giant Panda Habitat. (PhotoJessie Cohen, Smithsonians National Zoo)
Tai Shan, the giant panda cub at the Smithsonian's National Zoo, ventured outside for the first time this morning, Dec. 22, under the close eye of his mother, Mei Xiang. National Zoo staff also watched closely as the 5-month-old cub explored his outdoor exhibit yard, climbed on fallen trees and wrestled with his mother. Tai Shan and his parents live at the National Zoo's Fujifilm Giant Panda Habitat. (Photo/Jessie Cohen, Smithsonian's National Zoo)
In this photograph provided by the National Zoo, visitors get their first look at the National Zoos giant panda cub, Tai Shan, during the cubs public debut Thursday, Dec. 8, 2005 in Washington. Although he napped for part of his big day, Tai Shan, who was born on July 9, did come out of his den to play and explore his indoor exhibit. The National Zoo expects about 600 ticketed visitors each day to the Zoos Fujifilm Giant Panda Habitat. (AP PhotoNational Zoo, Jessie Cohen)
In this photograph provided by the National Zoo, visitors get their first look at the National Zoo's giant panda cub, Tai Shan, during the cub's public debut Thursday, Dec. 8, 2005 in Washington. Although he napped for part of his big day, Tai Shan, who was born on July 9, did come out of his den to play and explore his indoor exhibit. The National Zoo expects about 600 ticketed visitors each day to the Zoo's Fujifilm Giant Panda Habitat. (AP Photo/National Zoo, Jessie Cohen)
Gerri Posey braved the cold to be the first in line for same day tickets to see Tai Shan on Thursday, Dec. 8, 2005. In addition to those already handed out, the National Zoo is offering 60 tickets a day to see the cub. Tickets are available starting at 8 a.m. each day. (WTOP PhotoNeal Augenstein)
Gerri Posey braved the cold to be the first in line for same day tickets to see Tai Shan on Thursday, Dec. 8, 2005. In addition to those already handed out, the National Zoo is offering 60 tickets a day to see the cub. Tickets are available starting at 8 a.m. each day. (WTOP Photo/Neal Augenstein)
Tai Shan plays hide and seek with the cameras on Nov. 29, 2005. (AP)
Tai Shan plays hide and seek with the cameras on Nov. 29, 2005. (AP)
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Four-month-old Giant panda cub Tai Shan plays inside his den at the Smithsonian National Zoo, on Nov. 29, 2005. (AP)
Four-month-old Giant panda cub Tai Shan plays inside his den at the Smithsonian National Zoo, on Nov. 29, 2005. (AP)
No, its not a cigarette -- Tai Shan chews on a piece of bamboo on Nov. 29, 2005. (AP)
No, it's not a cigarette -- Tai Shan chews on a piece of bamboo on Nov. 29, 2005. (AP)
Tai Shan sits up and poses for cameras on Nov. 29, 2005. (AP)
Tai Shan sits up and poses for cameras on Nov. 29, 2005. (AP)
Tai Shan pulls himself up onto a ledge while playing on Nov. 29, 2005. (AP)
Tai Shan pulls himself up onto a ledge while playing on Nov. 29, 2005. (AP)
Panda cub Tai Shan nuzzles his mother, Mei Xiang, at their den at the National Zoo on Nov. 10, 2005. (AP)
Panda cub Tai Shan nuzzles his mother, Mei Xiang, at their den at the National Zoo on Nov. 10, 2005. (AP)
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Tai Shan is shown in this picture taken on Oct. 1, 2005. (AP)
Tai Shan is shown in this picture taken on Oct. 1, 2005. (AP)
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