AUTOPLAY 

Keepers are offering them bamboo and soaked apple biscuits. So far, the cubs mostly just gnaw on the bamboo and lick the biscuits. (Photos Janice SvedaSmithsonian Conservation Biology Institute)
Keepers are offering them bamboo and soaked apple biscuits. So far, the cubs mostly just gnaw on the bamboo and lick the biscuits. (Photos: Janice Sveda/Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute)
They are bottle-fed three times a day, and have received their first solid foods. (Photos Janice SvedaSmithsonian Conservation Biology Institute)
They are bottle-fed three times a day, and have received their first solid foods. (Photos: Janice Sveda/Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute)
Five cubs -- born to Regan, Low Mei and Shama -- are being hand-reared by keepers. (Photos Janice SvedaSmithsonian Conservation Biology Institute)
Five cubs -- born to Regan, Low Mei and Shama -- are being hand-reared by keepers. (Photos: Janice Sveda/Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute)
All of the red panda cubs born at the Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute this summer are growing. (Courtesy Janice SvedaSmithsonian Conservation Biology Institute)
All of the red panda cubs born at the Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute this summer are growing. (Courtesy Janice Sveda/Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute)
From the Smithsonian National Zoo Born June 16, 2014 at the Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute, this little red panda cub is thriving His mother, Regan, is very genetically valuable to the red panda population in human care, and keepers took every precaution to increase the likelihood of a successful birth. Because Regan has neglected cubs in the past, keepers are hand-rearing the cub and giving him round-the-clock care. According to his keepers, the7-week-old cub is eating well (4 feedings a day) and growing quickly. He now weighs 785 grams (Photo Credit Janice Sveda, Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute
From the Smithsonian National Zoo: "Born June 16, 2014 at the Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute, this little red panda cub is thriving! His mother, Regan, is very genetically valuable to the red panda population in human care, and keepers took every precaution to increase the likelihood of a successful birth. Because Regan has neglected cubs in the past, keepers are hand-rearing the cub and giving him round-the-clock care. According to his keepers, the7-week-old cub is eating well (4 feedings a day) and growing quickly. He now weighs 785 grams!" (Photo Credit: Janice Sveda, Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute"
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From the Smithsonian National Zoo Born June 16, 2014 at the Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute, this little red panda cub is thriving His mother, Regan, is very genetically valuable to the red panda population in human care, and keepers took every precaution to increase the likelihood of a successful birth. Because Regan has neglected cubs in the past, keepers are hand-rearing the cub and giving him round-the-clock care. According to his keepers, the7-week-old cub is eating well (4 feedings a day) and growing quickly. He now weighs 785 grams (Photo Credit Janice Sveda, Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute
From the Smithsonian National Zoo: "Born June 16, 2014 at the Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute, this little red panda cub is thriving! His mother, Regan, is very genetically valuable to the red panda population in human care, and keepers took every precaution to increase the likelihood of a successful birth. Because Regan has neglected cubs in the past, keepers are hand-rearing the cub and giving him round-the-clock care. According to his keepers, the7-week-old cub is eating well (4 feedings a day) and growing quickly. He now weighs 785 grams!" (Photo Credit: Janice Sveda, Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute"
From the Smithsonian National Zoo Born June 16, 2014 at the Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute, this little red panda cub is thriving His mother, Regan, is very genetically valuable to the red panda population in human care, and keepers took every precaution to increase the likelihood of a successful birth. Because Regan has neglected cubs in the past, keepers are hand-rearing the cub and giving him round-the-clock care. According to his keepers, the7-week-old cub is eating well (4 feedings a day) and growing quickly. He now weighs 785 grams (Photo Credit Janice Sveda, Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute
From the Smithsonian National Zoo: "Born June 16, 2014 at the Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute, this little red panda cub is thriving! His mother, Regan, is very genetically valuable to the red panda population in human care, and keepers took every precaution to increase the likelihood of a successful birth. Because Regan has neglected cubs in the past, keepers are hand-rearing the cub and giving him round-the-clock care. According to his keepers, the7-week-old cub is eating well (4 feedings a day) and growing quickly. He now weighs 785 grams!" (Photo Credit: Janice Sveda, Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute"
From the Smithsonian National Zoo Born June 16, 2014 at the Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute, this little red panda cub is thriving His mother, Regan, is very genetically valuable to the red panda population in human care, and keepers took every precaution to increase the likelihood of a successful birth. Because Regan has neglected cubs in the past, keepers are hand-rearing the cub and giving him round-the-clock care. According to his keepers, the7-week-old cub is eating well (4 feedings a day) and growing quickly. He now weighs 785 grams (Photo Credit Janice Sveda, Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute
From the Smithsonian National Zoo: "Born June 16, 2014 at the Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute, this little red panda cub is thriving! His mother, Regan, is very genetically valuable to the red panda population in human care, and keepers took every precaution to increase the likelihood of a successful birth. Because Regan has neglected cubs in the past, keepers are hand-rearing the cub and giving him round-the-clock care. According to his keepers, the7-week-old cub is eating well (4 feedings a day) and growing quickly. He now weighs 785 grams!" (Photo Credit: Janice Sveda, Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute"
From the Smithsonian National Zoo Born June 16, 2014 at the Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute, this little red panda cub is thriving His mother, Regan, is very genetically valuable to the red panda population in human care, and keepers took every precaution to increase the likelihood of a successful birth. Because Regan has neglected cubs in the past, keepers are hand-rearing the cub and giving him round-the-clock care. According to his keepers, the7-week-old cub is eating well (4 feedings a day) and growing quickly. He now weighs 785 grams (Photo Credit Janice Sveda, Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute)
From the Smithsonian National Zoo: "Born June 16, 2014 at the Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute, this little red panda cub is thriving! His mother, Regan, is very genetically valuable to the red panda population in human care, and keepers took every precaution to increase the likelihood of a successful birth. Because Regan has neglected cubs in the past, keepers are hand-rearing the cub and giving him round-the-clock care. According to his keepers, the7-week-old cub is eating well (4 feedings a day) and growing quickly. He now weighs 785 grams!" (Photo Credit: Janice Sveda, Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute)
Shama, a red panda at the National Zoo, gave birth June 26, 2014 to three cubs. They were born at the Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute in Front Royal, Va. Two cubs are in the center of the photo, one is nestled behind Shamas head. (Courtesy Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute)
Shama, a red panda at the National Zoo, gave birth June 26, 2014 to three cubs. They were born at the Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute in Front Royal, Va. Two cubs are in the center of the photo, one is nestled behind Shama's head. (Courtesy Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute)
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This is the red panda cub that lived after the National Zoos Regan gave birth on June 16, 2014.(Courtesy Janice SvedaSmithsonian Conservation Biology Institute)
This is the red panda cub that lived after the National Zoo's Regan gave birth on June 16, 2014.(Courtesy Janice Sveda/Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute)
The Nationals Zoos red panda Regan gave birth to cubs June 16, 2014. (Courtesy Janice SvedaSmithsonian Conservation Biology Institute)
The National's Zoo's red panda Regan gave birth to cubs June 16, 2014. (Courtesy Janice Sveda/Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute)
The National Zoos red panda Regan gave birth to two cubs June 16, 2014. One cub was stillborn. The other is being hand-reared to increase the chances of survival. The surviving cub is currently in critical condition and receiving round-the-clock care. Keepers took extra steps to prepare for the birth of Regans cubs. She has given birth before, but has neglected cubs in the past. As a result, keepers trained her to voluntarily participate in ultrasounds, they moved her to the veterinary hospital before the birth and monitored her 24 hours a day when she began showing signs consistent with an impending birth. Regan is very genetically valuable to the red panda population in human care, and keepers took every precaution to increase the likelihood of a successful birth. (Courtesy Janice SvedaSmithsonian Conservation Biology Institute)
The National Zoo's red panda Regan gave birth to two cubs June 16, 2014. One cub was stillborn. The other is being hand-reared to increase the chances of survival. The surviving cub is currently in critical condition and receiving round-the-clock care. Keepers took extra steps to prepare for the birth of Regan's cubs. She has given birth before, but has neglected cubs in the past. As a result, keepers trained her to voluntarily participate in ultrasounds, they moved her to the veterinary hospital before the birth and monitored her 24 hours a day when she began showing signs consistent with an impending birth. Regan is very genetically valuable to the red panda population in human care, and keepers took every precaution to increase the likelihood of a successful birth. (Courtesy Janice Sveda/Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute)
Two red panda cubs were born May 27, 2014 to female Yanhua and male Sherman. It was their first litter. This species is vulnerable because of habitat loss. Red pandas live in the cool temperate bamboo forests in parts of China, Nepal and northern Myanmar. There are fewer than 10,000 adult red pandas left in the wild. (Courtesy Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute)
Two red panda cubs were born May 27, 2014 to female Yanhua and male Sherman. It was their first litter. This species is vulnerable because of habitat loss. Red pandas live in the cool temperate bamboo forests in parts of China, Nepal and northern Myanmar. There are fewer than 10,000 adult red pandas left in the wild. (Courtesy Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute)
A short-eared elephant shrew was born May 8 at the Zoos Small Mammal House. The short-eared elephant shrew is the smallest of the 17 living species of elephant shrew, weighing between less than one-third of an ounce and 1.5 ounces at birth. It is too early to determine the babys sex. Although the tiny shrew has been active since birth, it stayed hidden for the first few days of its life, which is normal. Keepers are now getting more glimpses of the shrew as it comes out of its den to explore. These insect-eating mammals name comes from their noses resemblance to the trunk of an elephant. (Clyde Nishimura, Smithsonians National Zoo)
A short-eared elephant shrew was born May 8 at the Zoo's Small Mammal House. The short-eared elephant shrew is the smallest of the 17 living species of elephant shrew, weighing between less than one-third of an ounce and 1.5 ounces at birth. It is too early to determine the baby's sex. Although the tiny shrew has been active since birth, it stayed hidden for the first few days of its life, which is normal. Keepers are now getting more glimpses of the shrew as it comes out of its den to explore. These insect-eating mammals' name comes from their noses' resemblance to the trunk of an elephant.
(Clyde Nishimura, Smithsonian's National Zoo)
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A leaf-tailed gecko hatched June 2. The leaf-tailed gecko is a large, nocturnal gecko from Madagascar threatened with extensive habitat loss from cattle grazing, logging, and agriculture and collection for the pet trade. (Lauren Augustine, Smithsonians National Zoo)
A leaf-tailed gecko hatched June 2. The leaf-tailed gecko is a large, nocturnal gecko from Madagascar threatened with extensive habitat loss from cattle grazing, logging, and agriculture and collection for the pet trade.
(Lauren Augustine, Smithsonian's National Zoo)
A fishing cat, recently named Hunter, was born April 15 on Asia Trail. Inhabiting India and Southeast Asia, fishing cat populations are declining and the species is considered endangered because of habitat loss and hunting for food and fur. The first pair of twin fishing cats was born at the National Zoo in May 2012. Only one other facility accredited by the Association of Zoos and Aquariums has successfully bred fishing cats since 2009. (Susan Murray, Smithsonians National Zoo)
A fishing cat, recently named Hunter, was born April 15 on Asia Trail. Inhabiting India and Southeast Asia, fishing cat populations are declining and the species is considered endangered because of habitat loss and hunting for food and fur. The first pair of twin fishing cats was born at the National Zoo in May 2012. Only one other facility accredited by the Association of Zoos and Aquariums has successfully bred fishing cats since 2009.
(Susan Murray, Smithsonian's National Zoo)
Black-footed ferret kit season is in full swing at SCBI. Twenty-four ferrets have been born so far, and 10 more ferret mothers are due in the next few weeks (two were artificially inseminated). Black-footed ferrets were thought extinct until 1980, when a colony of ferrets was discovered in Wyoming. Today all black-footed ferrets are descended from 18 ferrets in that colony. More than 640 black-footed ferrets have been born at SCBI Front Royal to date, many of which have gone on to be reintroduced in the American West. (Smithsonians National Zoo)
Black-footed ferret kit season is in full swing at SCBI. Twenty-four ferrets have been born so far, and 10 more ferret mothers are due in the next few weeks (two were artificially inseminated). Black-footed ferrets were thought extinct until 1980, when a colony of ferrets was discovered in Wyoming. Today all black-footed ferrets are descended from 18 ferrets in that colony. More than 640 black-footed ferrets have been born at SCBI Front Royal to date, many of which have gone on to be reintroduced in the American West.
(Smithsonian's National Zoo)
Black-footed ferret kit season is in full swing at SCBI. Twenty-four ferrets have been born so far, and 10 more ferret mothers are due in the next few weeks (two were artificially inseminated). Black-footed ferrets were thought extinct until 1980, when a colony of ferrets was discovered in Wyoming. Today all black-footed ferrets are descended from 18 ferrets in that colony. More than 640 black-footed ferrets have been born at SCBI Front Royal to date, many of which have gone on to be reintroduced in the American West.(Smithsonians National Zoo)
Black-footed ferret kit season is in full swing at SCBI. Twenty-four ferrets have been born so far, and 10 more ferret mothers are due in the next few weeks (two were artificially inseminated). Black-footed ferrets were thought extinct until 1980, when a colony of ferrets was discovered in Wyoming. Today all black-footed ferrets are descended from 18 ferrets in that colony. More than 640 black-footed ferrets have been born at SCBI Front Royal to date, many of which have gone on to be reintroduced in the American West.
(Smithsonian's National Zoo)
Keepers at the Smithsonian National Zoo are hand-raising a female sloth bear cub -- one of three born to sloth bear Khali in late December. The bear being hand-raised is the only one who who survived (thanks to zoo staffs intervention) after the Khali ingested the first cub shortly after birth and ingested the second cub a week later. Veterinarians and zoo keepers have provided round-the-clock care for the past two-and-a-half months. The bear is thriving.(Courtesy Stacey Tabellario, Smithsonians National Zoo)
Keepers at the Smithsonian National Zoo are hand-raising a female sloth bear cub -- one of three born to sloth bear Khali in late December.

The bear being hand-raised is the only one who who survived (thanks to zoo staff's intervention) after the Khali ingested the first cub shortly after birth and ingested the second cub a week later.

Veterinarians and zoo keepers have provided round-the-clock care for the past two-and-a-half months. The bear is thriving.

(Courtesy Stacey Tabellario, Smithsonian's National Zoo)
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Smithsonian National Zoo zookeepers, veterinarians and nutritionists are hand-raising a female sloth bear cub who was born in late December.The bears two siblings did not survive more than a week and zoo staff decided to intervene and rear the remaining cub themselves -- a move that likely saved the cubs life. The sub is now almost three months old and is thriving. (Courtesy Stacey Tabellario, Smithsonians National Zoo)
Smithsonian National Zoo zookeepers, veterinarians and nutritionists are hand-raising a female sloth bear cub who was born in late December.

The bear's two siblings did not survive more than a week and zoo staff decided to intervene and rear the remaining cub themselves -- a move that likely saved the cub's life. The sub is now almost three months old and is thriving.

(Courtesy Stacey Tabellario, Smithsonian's National Zoo)
A female baby sloth bear cub at the Smithsonian National Zoo is doing well with constant care and interaction by zookeepers. She is being hand-raised by zookeepers and veterinarians after they discovered she was not thriving with her mother, Khali, who had ingested the cubs two siblings.(Courtesy Stacey Tabellario, Smithsonians National Zoo)
A female baby sloth bear cub at the Smithsonian National Zoo is doing well with constant care and interaction by zookeepers. She is being hand-raised by zookeepers and veterinarians after they discovered she was not thriving with her mother, Khali, who had ingested the cub's two siblings.

(Courtesy Stacey Tabellario, Smithsonian's National Zoo)
A male Dama gazelle calf, born Feb. 18, receives an exam from SCBI veterinarians. Animal care staff at the Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute in Front Royal, Va. are celebrating the birth of three male Dama gazelles. The calves were born Feb. 18, Feb. 20 and Feb. 25. At their 24-hour neonatal exam, the first calf weighed 11 pounds and the second and third calves weighed 12 pounds each. (Courtesy Dolores Reed, Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute
A male Dama gazelle calf, born Feb. 18, receives an exam from SCBI veterinarians.

Animal care staff at the Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute in Front Royal, Va. are celebrating the birth of three male Dama gazelles. The calves were born Feb. 18, Feb. 20 and Feb. 25. At their 24-hour neonatal exam, the first calf weighed 11 pounds and the second and third calves weighed 12 pounds each.

(Courtesy Dolores Reed, Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute
March really came in like a lion for the National Zoo. On March 2, Shera, a 9-year-old African lion, gave birth to second litter of cubs. In all, there are four cubs. The zoo says they appear healthy so far. The father is an 8-year-old lion named Luke. Zoo officials say they are cautiously optimistic that the cubs will thrive based on Sheras passed successful litter. The cubs will likely be on display in early summer.
March really came in like a lion for the National Zoo.

On March 2, Shera, a 9-year-old African lion, gave birth to second litter of cubs.

In all, there are four cubs. The zoo says they appear healthy so far. The father is an 8-year-old lion named Luke.

Zoo officials say they are "cautiously optimistic" that the cubs will thrive based on Shera's passed successful litter.

The cubs will likely be on display in early summer.
Zookeepers got their first in-person look at two lion cubs born earlier this year in early February. Both cubs are healthy and growing. (Smithsonian National ZooFlickr)
Zookeepers got their first in-person look at two lion cubs born earlier this year in early February. Both cubs are healthy and growing. (Smithsonian National Zoo/Flickr)
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The Smithsonian National Zoo welcomed a female gray seal pup on Jan. 21, 2014. The seals mother is gray seal Kara.
The Smithsonian National Zoo welcomed a female gray seal pup on Jan. 21, 2014. The seal's mother is gray seal Kara. (Smithsonian National Zoo/Flickr)
After a tough start, the National Zoos new seal pup appears to be thriving and rapidly gaining weight. She now weighs 60 pounds thats almost double her birth weight. The zoo published this video Feb. 5, 2014. ,br (Courtesy National Zoo)
After a tough start, the National Zoo's new seal pup appears to be thriving and rapidly gaining weight. She now weighs 60 pounds; that's almost double her birth weight.

The zoo published this video Feb. 5, 2014.
,br> (Courtesy National Zoo)
The Smithsonian National Zoo welcomed a female gray seal pup on Jan. 21, 2014. The seals mother is gray seal Kara.
The Smithsonian National Zoo welcomed a female gray seal pup on Jan. 21, 2014. The seal's mother is gray seal Kara. (Smithsonian National Zoo/Flickr)
The Smithsonian National Zoo welcomed a female gray seal pup on Jan. 21, 2014. The seals mother is gray seal Kara.
The Smithsonian National Zoo welcomed a female gray seal pup on Jan. 21, 2014. The seal's mother is gray seal Kara. (Smithsonian National Zoo/Flickr)
The Smithsonian National Zoo welcomed a female gray seal pup on Jan. 21, 2014. The seals mother is gray seal Kara.
The Smithsonian National Zoo welcomed a female gray seal pup on Jan. 21, 2014. The seal's mother is gray seal Kara. (Smithsonian National Zoo/Flickr)
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The Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute welcomed a Micronesian kingfisher on Jan. 1, 2014. There are only 129 birds in the world and they are extinct in the wild.
The Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute welcomed a Micronesian kingfisher on Jan. 1, 2014. There are only 129 birds in the world and they are extinct in the wild. (Smithsonian National Zoo/Flickr)
The Smithsonian National Zoos African lion Nababiep gave birth Jan. 24, 2014 to three cubs, two of whom survived.
The Smithsonian National Zoo's African lion Nababiep gave birth Jan. 24, 2014 to three cubs, two of whom survived. (Smithsonian National Zoo/Flickr)
Five adult female degus just arrived at the Small Mammal House. During their entrance exams, we discovered a surprise-one was pregnant After she gave birth in quarantine, we now have an active group of nine degus at Small Mammals with six females on exhibit and three males behind-the-scenes. Degus are small rodents native to Chile and have an unusual adaptation for dealing with predators if they are caught by their tail, they can slip out of it They can only use this technique once though, because the tail wont grow back. (Photo Clyde Nishimura, FONZ Photo Club)
Five adult female degus just arrived at the Small Mammal House. During their entrance exams, we discovered a surprise-one was pregnant! After she gave birth in quarantine, we now have an active group of nine degus at Small Mammals with six females on exhibit and three males behind-the-scenes. Degus are small rodents native to Chile and have an unusual adaptation for dealing with predators: if they are caught by their tail, they can slip out of it! They can only use this technique once though, because the tail won't grow back. (Photo: Clyde Nishimura, FONZ Photo Club)
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