AUTOPLAY 

Nubian goats from upstate New York chomp on weeds Wednesday, July 24, 2013, in Sandy Hook, N.J. The 11 goats are the first line of defense to save New Jerseys historic Fort Hancock from a poison ivy invasion. The Sandy Hook Foundation is paying Larry Cihanek of Rhinebeck, N.Y., about 12,000 to use about two dozen goats to clear the site to make it more accessible to the public. (AP PhotoMel Evans)
Nubian goats from upstate New York chomp on weeds Wednesday, July 24, 2013, in Sandy Hook, N.J. The 11 goats are the first line of defense to save New Jersey's historic Fort Hancock from a poison ivy invasion. The Sandy Hook Foundation is paying Larry Cihanek of Rhinebeck, N.Y., about $12,000 to use about two dozen goats to clear the site to make it more accessible to the public. (AP Photo/Mel Evans)
Eleven Nubian goats from upstate New York walk together Wednesday, July 24, 2013, in Sandy Hook, N.J. The goats are the first line of defense to save New Jerseys historic Fort Hancock from a poison ivy invasion. The plants have overtaken the Sandy Hook mortar battery that defended New York Harbor during World War II. The Sandy Hook Foundation is paying Larry Cihanek of Rhinebeck, N.Y., about 12,000 to use about two dozen goats to clear the site to make it more accessible to the public. (AP PhotoMel Evans)
Eleven Nubian goats from upstate New York walk together Wednesday, July 24, 2013, in Sandy Hook, N.J. The goats are the first line of defense to save New Jersey's historic Fort Hancock from a poison ivy invasion. The plants have overtaken the Sandy Hook mortar battery that defended New York Harbor during World War II. The Sandy Hook Foundation is paying Larry Cihanek of Rhinebeck, N.Y., about $12,000 to use about two dozen goats to clear the site to make it more accessible to the public. (AP Photo/Mel Evans)
A goat surveys the task in front of him shortly after being released into a unkempt acre and a half of land south of Congressional Cemetery Wednesday. (WTOPMegan Cloherty)
A goat surveys the task in front of him shortly after being released into a unkempt acre and a half of land south of Congressional Cemetery Wednesday. (WTOP/Megan Cloherty)
The east end of Congressional Cemetery is well manicured, but just south of here the brush is difficult to walk through. (WTOPMegan Cloherty)
The east end of Congressional Cemetery is well manicured, but just south of here the brush is difficult to walk through. (WTOP/Megan Cloherty)
A pair of goats tackles an especially tasty branch inside Congressional Cemetery. (WTOPMegan Cloherty)
A pair of goats tackles an especially tasty branch inside Congressional Cemetery. (WTOP/Megan Cloherty)
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The goats are eating everything from poison ivy to honeysuckle inside this patch of unkempt land near the Anacostia River. (WTOPMegan Cloherty)
The goats are eating everything from poison ivy to honeysuckle inside this patch of unkempt land near the Anacostia River. (WTOP/Megan Cloherty)
The goats are eating everything from poison ivy to honeysuckle inside this patch of unkempt land near the Anacostia River. (WTOPMegan Cloherty)
Eco-Goats and Congressional Cemetery agreed to electrify the fence to keep the goats inside and protect them from would-be goat thieves. The fence was not electrified while the public was on hand to see the goats released into the fenced-off land Wednesday.(WTOPMegan Cloherty)
Eco-Goats and Congressional Cemetery agreed to electrify the fence to keep the goats inside and protect them from would-be goat thieves. The fence was not electrified while the public was on hand to see the goats released into the fenced-off land Wednesday.(WTOP/Megan Cloherty)
A journalist snaps a photo of a goat who has found something particularly tasty near the fence. The fence was not electrified while the public was on hand to see the goats released into the fenced-off land. (WTOPMegan Cloherty)
A journalist snaps a photo of a goat who has found something particularly tasty near the fence. The fence was not electrified while the public was on hand to see the goats released into the fenced-off land. (WTOP/Megan Cloherty)
Colette Josar, 2, looks to her mother in reaction to the nearby goat moving towards her. (WTOPMegan Cloherty)
Colette Josar, 2, looks to her mother in reaction to the nearby goat moving towards her. (WTOP/Megan Cloherty)
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Every once in a while, we come across vegetation that they havent had before. Theyll usually ignore it for a day or two. If someone tries it and they dont die, then everybody jumps on it, says Brian Knox with Eco-Goats. (WTOPMegan Cloherty)
''Every once in a while, we come across vegetation that they haven't had before. They'll usually ignore it for a day or two. If someone tries it and they don't die, then everybody jumps on it,'' says Brian Knox with Eco-Goats. (WTOP/Megan Cloherty)
Journalists, families and curious members of the community gathered near the fence to try and get a glimpse of the hungry goats at Congressional Cemetery on August 7, 2013. (WTOPMegan Cloherty)
Journalists, families and curious members of the community gathered near the fence to try and get a glimpse of the hungry goats at Congressional Cemetery on August 7, 2013. (WTOP/Megan Cloherty)
These goats will eat just about anything. Oh, they love poison ivy. Im not sure about these morning glories. Theyve never seen them, says Brian Knox of Eco-Goats. (WTOPMegan Cloherty)
These goats will eat just about anything. ''Oh, they love poison ivy. I'm not sure about these morning glories. They've never seen them,'' says Brian Knox of Eco-Goats. (WTOP/Megan Cloherty)
These goats will eat just about anything. Oh, they love poison ivy. Im not sure about these morning glories. Theyve never seen them, says Brian Knox of Eco-Goats. (WTOPMegan Cloherty)
Two goats tag team a branch inside Congressional Cemeterys land to the south of the cemetarys east end. (WTOPMegan Cloherty)
Two goats tag team a branch inside Congressional Cemetery's land to the south of the cemetary's east end. (WTOP/Megan Cloherty)
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Colette Josar, 2, is enamored with the Eco-Goats brought in to clear land south of the cemetery Wednesday. (WTOPMegan Cloherty)
Colette Josar, 2, is enamored with the Eco-Goats brought in to clear land south of the cemetery Wednesday. (WTOP/Megan Cloherty)
Human crews dug the space for the fence on Congressional Cemetery land, but the goats will do the hard work, clearing more than an acre of thick brush, weeds and ivy. (WTOPMegan Cloherty)
Human crews dug the space for the fence on Congressional Cemetery land, but the goats will do the hard work, clearing more than an acre of thick brush, weeds and ivy. (WTOP/Megan Cloherty)
Ethan and Charlie have a great view of three of the goats dropped off Wednesday at Congressional Cemetery. (WTOPMegan Cloherty)
Ethan and Charlie have a great view of three of the goats dropped off Wednesday at Congressional Cemetery. (WTOP/Megan Cloherty)
A Nubian goat from upstate New York chomps on weeds Wednesday, July 24, 2013, in Sandy Hook, N.J. The 11 goats are the first line of defense to save New Jerseys historic Fort Hancock from a poison ivy invasion. The Sandy Hook Foundation is paying Larry Cihanek of Rhinebeck, N.Y., about 12,000 to use about two dozen goats to clear the site to make it more accessible to the public. (AP PhotoMel Evans)
A Nubian goat from upstate New York chomps on weeds Wednesday, July 24, 2013, in Sandy Hook, N.J. The 11 goats are the first line of defense to save New Jersey's historic Fort Hancock from a poison ivy invasion. The Sandy Hook Foundation is paying Larry Cihanek of Rhinebeck, N.Y., about $12,000 to use about two dozen goats to clear the site to make it more accessible to the public. (AP Photo/Mel Evans)
As owner Larry Cihanek stands nearby, some Nubian goats from upstate New York rest in a shade Wednesday, July 24, 2013, in Sandy Hook, N.J. The 11 goats are the first line of defense to save New Jerseys historic Fort Hancock from a poison ivy invasion. The plants have overtaken the Sandy Hook mortar battery that defended New York Harbor during World War II. The Sandy Hook Foundation is paying Cihanek of Rhinebeck, N.Y., about 12,000 to use about two dozen goats to clear the site to make it more accessible to the public. (AP PhotoMel Evans)
As owner Larry Cihanek stands nearby, some Nubian goats from upstate New York rest in a shade Wednesday, July 24, 2013, in Sandy Hook, N.J. The 11 goats are the first line of defense to save New Jersey's historic Fort Hancock from a poison ivy invasion. The plants have overtaken the Sandy Hook mortar battery that defended New York Harbor during World War II. The Sandy Hook Foundation is paying Cihanek of Rhinebeck, N.Y., about $12,000 to use about two dozen goats to clear the site to make it more accessible to the public. (AP Photo/Mel Evans)
bnv.wtop.photogalleries/animals;animals=main;tile=3;pos=mid1;sz=300x250;ord=
A Nubian goat from upstate New York chomps on weeds Wednesday, July 24, 2013, in Sandy Hook, N.J. The 11 goats are the first line of defense to save New Jerseys historic Fort Hancock from a poison ivy invasion. The plants have overtaken the Sandy Hook mortar battery that defended New York Harbor during World War II. The Sandy Hook Foundation is paying Larry Cihanek of Rhinebeck, N.Y., about 12,000 to use about two dozen goats to clear the site to make it more accessible to the public. (AP PhotoMel Evans)
A Nubian goat from upstate New York chomps on weeds Wednesday, July 24, 2013, in Sandy Hook, N.J. The 11 goats are the first line of defense to save New Jersey's historic Fort Hancock from a poison ivy invasion. The plants have overtaken the Sandy Hook mortar battery that defended New York Harbor during World War II. The Sandy Hook Foundation is paying Larry Cihanek of Rhinebeck, N.Y., about $12,000 to use about two dozen goats to clear the site to make it more accessible to the public. (AP Photo/Mel Evans)
Children watch as goats graze in a fenced-off area at Congressional Cemetery in Washington, Wednesday, Aug. 7, 2013. More than 100 goats will be taking over Washingtons Historic Congressional Cemetery to help clean up brush in an area away from the graves. The goats will graze 24 hours a day for six days to eliminate vines, poison ivy and weeds, while also fertilizing the ground. (AP PhotoCharles Dharapak)
Children watch as goats graze in a fenced-off area at Congressional Cemetery in Washington, Wednesday, Aug. 7, 2013. More than 100 goats will be taking over Washington's Historic Congressional Cemetery to help clean up brush in an area away from the graves. The goats will graze 24 hours a day for six days to eliminate vines, poison ivy and weeds, while also "fertilizing the ground." (AP Photo/Charles Dharapak)
Reporters photograph goats as they are released from a trailer at Congressional Cemetery in Washington, Wednesday, Aug. 7, 2013. More than 100 goats will be taking over Washingtons Historic Congressional Cemetery to help clean up brush in an area away from the graves. The goats will graze 24 hours a day for six days to eliminate vines, poison ivy and weeds, while also fertilizing the ground. (AP PhotoCharles Dharapak)
Reporters photograph goats as they are released from a trailer at Congressional Cemetery in Washington, Wednesday, Aug. 7, 2013. More than 100 goats will be taking over Washington's Historic Congressional Cemetery to help clean up brush in an area away from the graves. The goats will graze 24 hours a day for six days to eliminate vines, poison ivy and weeds, while also "fertilizing the ground." (AP Photo/Charles Dharapak)
A goat grazes in the brush in a fenced off area at Congressional Cemetery in Washington, Wednesday, Aug. 7, 2013. More than 100 goats will be taking over Washingtons Historic Congressional Cemetery to help clean up brush in an area away from the graves. The goats will graze 24 hours a day for six days to eliminate vines, poison ivy and weeds, while also fertilizing the ground. (AP PhotoCharles Dharapak)
A goat grazes in the brush in a fenced off area at Congressional Cemetery in Washington, Wednesday, Aug. 7, 2013. More than 100 goats will be taking over Washington's Historic Congressional Cemetery to help clean up brush in an area away from the graves. The goats will graze 24 hours a day for six days to eliminate vines, poison ivy and weeds, while also "fertilizing the ground." (AP Photo/Charles Dharapak)
Goats are released from a trailer at Congressional Cemetery in Washington, Wednesday, Aug. 7, 2013. More than 100 goats will be taking over Washingtons Historic Congressional Cemetery to help clean up brush in an area away from the graves. The goats will graze 24 hours a day for six days to eliminate vines, poison ivy and weeds, while also fertilizing the ground. (AP PhotoCharles Dharapak)
Goats are released from a trailer at Congressional Cemetery in Washington, Wednesday, Aug. 7, 2013. More than 100 goats will be taking over Washington's Historic Congressional Cemetery to help clean up brush in an area away from the graves. The goats will graze 24 hours a day for six days to eliminate vines, poison ivy and weeds, while also "fertilizing the ground." (AP Photo/Charles Dharapak)
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A photograph of goats on a lawn sign directs reporters to where goats will be released at Congressional Cemetery in Washington, Wednesday, Aug. 7, 2013. More than 100 goats will be taking over Washingtons Historic Congressional Cemetery to help clean up brush in an area away from the graves. The goats will graze 24 hours a day for six days to eliminate vines, poison ivy and weeds, while also fertilizing the ground. (AP PhotoCharles Dharapak)
A photograph of goats on a lawn sign directs reporters to where goats will be released at Congressional Cemetery in Washington, Wednesday, Aug. 7, 2013. More than 100 goats will be taking over Washington's Historic Congressional Cemetery to help clean up brush in an area away from the graves. The goats will graze 24 hours a day for six days to eliminate vines, poison ivy and weeds, while also "fertilizing the ground." (AP Photo/Charles Dharapak)
Congressional Cemetery sits near rough terrain next to the Anacostia River. (WFEDShefali Kapadia)
Congressional Cemetery sits near rough terrain next to the Anacostia River. (WFED/Shefali Kapadia)
Five dozen goats will munch on vegetation for the next seven days. (WFEDShefali Kapadia)
Five dozen goats will munch on vegetation for the next seven days. (WFED/Shefali Kapadia)
Brian Knox with Eco-Goats delivered 60 goats to Congressional Cemetery Wednesday. (WFEDShefali Kapadia)
Brian Knox with Eco-Goats delivered 60 goats to Congressional Cemetery Wednesday. (WFED/Shefali Kapadia)
The goats eat honeysuckle, English ivy, porcelain berry, poison ivy and pretty much everything. (WFEDShefali Kapadia)
The goats eat honeysuckle, English ivy, porcelain berry, poison ivy and pretty much everything. (WFED/Shefali Kapadia)
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In seven days, Brian Knox expects his goats will have cleared an acre and a half thats currently obstructing cemetery visitors view of the river. (WFEDShefali Kapadia)
In seven days, Brian Knox expects his goats will have cleared an acre and a half that's currently obstructing cemetery visitors' view of the river. (WFED/Shefali Kapadia)
The fence has been electrified while the goats do their work so as to prevent runaways. (WFEDShefali Kapadia)
The fence has been electrified while the goats do their work so as to prevent runaways. (WFED/Shefali Kapadia)
Congressional Cemetery officials had been looking for a green solution to the heavily wooded area. (WFEDShefali Kapadia)
Congressional Cemetery officials had been looking for a green solution to the heavily wooded area. (WFED/Shefali Kapadia)
At first nervous among the crowd of onlookers and journalists, the goats got down to business at Congressional Cemetery. (WFEDShefali Kapadia)
At first nervous among the crowd of onlookers and journalists, the goats got down to business at Congressional Cemetery. (WFED/Shefali Kapadia)
The goats are expected to clear the area in seven days. (WFEDShefali Kapadia)
The goats are expected to clear the area in seven days. (WFED/Shefali Kapadia)
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Its rough terrain near the Anacostia River full of downed logs, ivy and ditches, so the Congressional Cemetery rolled in five dozen goats to clear it. (WFEDShefali Kapadia)
It's rough terrain near the Anacostia River full of downed logs, ivy and ditches, so the Congressional Cemetery rolled in five dozen goats to clear it. (WFED/Shefali Kapadia)
The land south of the cemeterys east end has grown over.(WFEDShefali Kapadia)
The land south of the cemetery's east end has grown over.(WFED/Shefali Kapadia)
Bush honeysuckle, English ivy, porcelain berry, poison ivy and anything else. The goats will eat it. (WFEDShefali Kapadia)
Bush honeysuckle, English ivy, porcelain berry, poison ivy and anything else. The goats will eat it. (WFED/Shefali Kapadia)
Its rough terrain near the Anacostia River full of downed logs, ivy and ditches, so the Congressional Cemetery rolled in five dozen goats to clear it. (WFEDShefali Kapadia)
It's rough terrain near the Anacostia River full of downed logs, ivy and ditches, so the Congressional Cemetery rolled in five dozen goats to clear it. (WFED/Shefali Kapadia)
The goats were nervous at the site of a crowd, but then they got down to business at Congressional Cemetery. (WFEDShefali Kapadia)
The goats were nervous at the site of a crowd, but then they got down to business at Congressional Cemetery. (WFED/Shefali Kapadia)
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After the goats had trimmed the greens. (WTOPMegan Cloherty)
After the goats had trimmed the greens. (WTOP/Megan Cloherty)
Before the goats had feasted. (WTOPMegan Cloherty)
Before the goats had feasted. (WTOP/Megan Cloherty)
Before and after shot. (WTOPMegan Cloherty)
Before and after shot. (WTOP/Megan Cloherty)
All the goats hanging together. (WTOPMegan Cloherty)
All the goats hanging together. (WTOP/Megan Cloherty)
Goats before the chowdown. (WTOPMegan Cloherty)
Goats before the chowdown. (WTOP/Megan Cloherty)
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