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Dead Taiwan songstress returns for 'virtual' show

Saturday - 9/7/2013, 1:48pm  ET

In this image released by JVR Music International, Taiwan's famed pop singer Jay Chou, right, performs on stage with a virtual digital rendering of the late pop diva Teresa Teng to a crowd of 15,000 fans at the Taipei Area in Taipei, Taiwan, Friday, Sept. 6, 2013. Teng's virtual presence was the result of a detailed recreation of her mannerisms and expressions, painstakingly put together by Digital Domain 3.0, a California company specializing in digital imagery for the entertainment industry. (AP Photo/JVR Music International)

TAIPEI, Taiwan (AP) -- Pop diva Teresa Teng may not exactly have come back from the dead to perform in a widely hyped concert in her native Taiwan, but a computer-generated likeness of the legendary singer sure left that impression among many of the 15,000 fans packing a Taipei arena.

Teng, who died 18 years ago, "appeared" onstage Friday night with local crooner and movie actor Jay Chou to perform three duets that enraptured the crowd. Her virtual presence was the result of a detailed recreation of Teng's mannerisms and expressions, painstakingly put together by Digital Domain 3.0, a California company specializing in digital imagery for the entertainment industry.

Dressed in an ethereal looking white gown, the virtual Teng joined Chou in her own wildly popular "What Have You to Say," along with two well-known Chou standards -- "Red Tavern" and "Thousand Miles Away."

The crispness of the renditions and the stunning reality of Teng's appearance had many in the crowd shaking their heads in wonder.

Teng, best known for folk songs and romantic ballads, had legions of fans throughout Asia and beyond when she died at age 42 of a respiratory attack in 1995. Selected by Time Magazine as one of the world's top seven female vocalists in 1986, she was celebrated for a sincere and simple style that made her voice instantly recognizable not only when she sang in her native Mandarin Chinese, but also in Japanese and English, which she also recorded in.

Her songs were used in the soundtrack of Wayne Wang's acclaimed film, "The Joy Luck Club," which came out just two years before her 1995 death.


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