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UPDATED: Person struck by train at Bethesda Metro

By Aaron Kraut

Tuesday - 6/3/2014, 5:02pm  ET

Photo via MCFRS spokesperson Pete 
Piringer Photo via MCFRS spokesperson Pete 
Piringer Photo via MCFRS spokesperson Pete 
Piringer

(Update 10:15 a.m. Wednesday) The man who fell on to a track at the Bethesda Metro station and was hit by a slow moving train checked himself out of the hospital on Tuesday night.

Metro spokesperson Morgan Dye said the man, who was hit by the train at about 5 p.m. on Tuesday, was in good enough condition to leave the hospital.

The person was struck by a train going at a low speed on the inbound track, according to MCFRS spokesperson Pete Piringer. MCFRS units on the scene believe the man suffered a medical emergency, possibly a seizure or diabetes-related incident before falling into the path of the train.

The Washington Post reported the man is from Rockville and has a history of seizures. Metro would not release the man's name and Dye said Metro wouldn't yet release any additional details.

(Update 5:45 p.m.) MCFRS said a person suffered serious, life threatening injuries after being struck by a train at the Bethesda Metro station around 5 p.m.

The person was struck by a train going at a low speed on the inbound track, according to MCFRS spokesperson Pete Piringer. MCFRS units on the scene believe the man suffered a medical emergency, possibly a seizure or diabetes- related incident before falling into the path of the train.

Metro Transit Police tweeted that the person is an adult man and was conscious and breathing when found on the track bed. Metro Transit Police also tweeted that the incident appears accidental.

Piringer said crews waited for Metro to shut down power to the track before entering the track bed to extricate the person.

Red Line trains resumed service at the station at 5:45 p.m., according to Metro.

Trains bypassed the Bethesda station and Metro requested shuttle service for about 30 minutes. Reports from the scene indicated Metro officials had closed the escalators to the station and cleared the platform.

Photos via MCFRS spokesperson Pete Piringer