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Korman Announces Supporters, Cooper Hosting A Pool Party

By Aaron Kraut

Tuesday - 7/9/2013, 1:20pm  ET

Marc Korman (blue shirt) with supporters on July 4District 16 House of Delegates candidate Marc Korman this week revealed a list of about 90 local supporters, drawing on his time in the county’s Democratic Party and in a number of Bethesda-based civic and community organizations.

Korman, who has now officially filed for election, on Monday announced members of his campaign committee, a long list of local civic leaders including real estate agent Jane Fairweather, former Chairman of the Montgomery County Democratic Party Stan Gildenhorn and big-time political donor Josh Rales.

“I am excited to engage in a campaign of ideas. The most important issue facing our community is sustainable economic growth and prosperity for all. Improving the outlook for jobs and economic success will allow us to do many of the things we desire as progressives: Improving our quality of life, cleaning up the environment, rebuilding our infrastructure, and assisting those less fortunate.  In our community, that means focusing on our successful schools and our transportation network,” Korman said in a press release.

The release included testimonials from a number of District 16 residents and activists. Korman chairs the Western Montgomery County Citizens Advisory Board and is the secretary of the Bethesda Urban Partnership Board of Directors. He’s also served on the Montgomery County Democratic Central Committee.

He also appears to have a fundraising jump on the other two announced candidates — Hrant Jamgochian and Jordan Cooper — though Jamgochian’s campaign said it recently raised $20,000 and it’s unknown if his campaign has more money in the bank.

Meanwhile, the 28-year-old Cooper will try to raise money this weekend with an event he hopes will play to his age group. On Sunday from 3 p.m. to 7 p.m., Cooper will host a pool party fundraiser with a Baltimore alt rock band, “to engage the Millennial Generation in politics and make our collective voices heard.”

Photo via MarcKorman.com