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Arthur moves up coast, soaking New England

Friday - 7/4/2014, 3:40pm  ET

BOSTON (AP) -- It's not much of a beach day on this Fourth of July along the mid-Atlantic coast and the Northeast, as Hurricane Arthur makes its way north.

Beachgoers at the Jersey Shore are being warned about potentially dangerous rip currents and forecasters say the storm could also bring periods of heavy rain and gusty winds. There's been some flooding in Cape May and other coastal areas of south Jersey.

The National Weather Service has issued a flurry of advisories for New England, including flash flood watches and warnings with up to 6 inches of rainfall possible in some areas.

A hurricane warning has been issued for the Atlantic Ocean east of Cape Cod, with Arthur centered 145 miles southwest of Nantucket at last report.

But the weather is already clearing in North Carolina's Outer Banks, which had a five-hour encounter with Arthur overnight. State emergency officials say more than 40,000 people lost power and floodwaters buckled part of a state highway on Hatteras Island. Gov. Pat McCrory says officials hope to have the road and the bridge to Hatteras open by the end of the day tomorrow.

%@AP Links

157-a-11-(Greg Baker, commissioner of law enforcement, North Carolina Department of Public Safety, in AP interview)-"a different dynamic"-North Carolina Public Safety Commissioner Greg Baker says the speed of the storm helped minimize its impact. (4 Jul 2014)

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156-a-09-(Greg Baker, commissioner of law enforcement, North Carolina Department of Public Safety, in AP interview)-"of harm's way"-North Carolina Public Safety Commissioner Greg Baker says businesses cooperated to make sure the public was safe. (4 Jul 2014)

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149-a-17-(Governor Pat McCrory, R-N.C., at news conference)-"island and others"-North Carolina Governor Pat McCrory says a few areas have lost electric service. (4 Jul 2014)

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147-a-15-(Governor Pat McCrory, R-N.C., at news conference)-"North Carolina beaches"-North Carolina Governor Pat McCrory says the state's popular beach areas are again open for holiday recreation. (4 Jul 2014)

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150-a-07-(Governor Pat McCrory, R-N.C., at news conference)-"some dock debris"-North Carolina Governor Pat McCrory says damage from the storm is minor. (4 Jul 2014)

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148-a-09-(Governor Pat McCrory, R-N.C., at news conference)-"of Hurricane Arthur"-North Carolina Governor Pat McCrory says public responsiveness helped prevent damage and injuries from the storm. (4 Jul 2014)

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146-a-13-(Governor Pat McCrory, R-N.C., at news conference)-"all our faces"-North Carolina Governor Pat McCrory says the state has come through Hurricane Arthur with barely a scratch. (4 Jul 2014)

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APPHOTO VANOV105: Daisy de King of the Dominican Republic embraces her eight-month-old daughter after a quick swim, Friday, July 4, 2014 in Virginia Beach, Va. The storm was expected to bring a lousy July Fourth beach day with it as it moved offshore of the northeast coast. Forecasters did predict a second landfall Saturday evening in New Brunswick and Nova Scotia in Canada. (AP Photo/The Virginian-Pilot, Rich-Joseph Facun) MAGS OUT (4 Jul 2014)

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APPHOTO VANOV104: Nags Head police block the traffic leading to Manteo, N.C. as emergency high clearance vehicle passes through the roadway and wind from the Hurricane Arthur pushes the sound water in south of Nags Head, N.C., Friday, July 4, 2014. Arthur struck North Carolina as a Category 2 storm with winds of 100 mph late Thursday, taking about five hours to move across the far eastern part of the state. (AP Photo/The Virginian-Pilot, Hyunsoo Leo Kim) (4 Jul 2014)

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APPHOTO VANOV103: Bryan Wilson, owner of Millerís Waterfront restaurant, braves floodwaters to check the damage to his property as wind from the Hurricane Arthur pushes water to his parking lot in Nags Head, N.C. Friday, July 4, 2014. Arthur struck North Carolina as a Category 2 storm with winds of 100 mph late Thursday, taking about five hours to move across the far eastern part of the state. (AP Photo/The Virginian-Pilot, Hyunsoo Leo Kim) (4 Jul 2014)

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APPHOTO NY129: Water from Hurricane Arthur buckled a section of North Carolina Highway 12 on Hatteras Island, seen in a Friday, July 4, 2014 photo provided by the North Carolina Department of Transportation. It is the same spot on Hatteras Island that was breached in Hurricane Irene in 2011. Proving far less damaging than feared, Hurricane Arthur left tens of thousands of people without power Friday in a swipe at North Carolina's dangerously exposed Outer Banks, but the weather along the narrow barrier islands had already cleared by Friday afternoon (AP Photo/North Carolina Department of Transportation) (4 Jul 2014)

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