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Slain ambassador among those faulted in Senate report on Benghazi

Wednesday - 1/15/2014, 3:30pm  ET

WASHINGTON (AP) -- The Senate Intelligence Committee is blaming the State Department, the intelligence community and even the late Ambassador Chris Stevens for failing to communicate and heed warnings of terrorist activity before the 2012 assault on the U.S. diplomatic compound in Benghazi, Libya. If they had done so, the report says, the attack could have been prevented.

Stevens and three other Americans were killed in the attack.

The panel's report says the U.S. military was not positioned to aid the Americans because the ambassador had rejected its offers of security teams.

The report also deals with the talking points issued by the intelligence community after the attacks, which helped fuel Republican allegations that the Obama administration was covering up the involvement of militants.

According to the report, intelligence analysts incorrectly referred to the presence of a protest at the diplomatic post before the attack. It says they didn't have "sufficient intelligence or eyewitness statements" to back up those reports.

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175-c-16-(Jerry Bodlander, AP correspondent)-"target U.S. facilities"-AP correspondent Jerry Bodlander reports a Senate committee says the attack on the U.S. consulate in Libya was avoidable. (15 Jan 2014)

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177-c-26-(Jerry Bodlander, AP correspondent)-"important situational awareness"-AP correspondent Jerry Bodlander reports says the military wasn't able to offer any help. (15 Jan 2014)

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APPHOTO WX113: FILE - This Sept 13, 2012 file photo shows a Libyan man investigating the inside of the U.S. Consulate in Benghazi, Libya, after an attack that killed four Americans, including Ambassador Chris Stevens. The Senate Intelligence Committee released a report on the deadly assault on the diplomatic compound in Benghazi, Libya, Wednesday, laying blame on the State Department, the late Ambassador Chris Stevens and the intelligence community for failing to communicate and heed warnings of terrorist activity in the area and protect diplomatic facilities. The highly critical report also says the U.S. military was not positioned to aid the Americans in need, though the head of Africa Command had offered military security teams that Stevens -- who was killed in the attack -- had rejected weeks before the attack. (AP Photo/Mohammad Hannon, File) (13 Sep 2012)

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