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North Korea executes leader's uncle as a traitor

Friday - 12/13/2013, 5:09am  ET

CORRECTS DATE TO DEC. 13 INSTEAD OF DEC. 6 - FILE - In this July 27, 2013 file photo, North Korean leader Kim Jong Un, center, is followed by his uncle Jang Song Thaek, second from left, and Yang Hyong Sop, left, vice president of the Presidium of North Korea's parliament, as he tours the newly opened Fatherland Liberation War Museum as part of celebrations for the 60th anniversary of the Korean War armistice in Pyongyang, North Korea. North Korea on Friday, Dec. 13, 2013 announced the execution of Kim Jong Un's uncle, calling the leader's former mentor a traitor who tried to overthrow the state. The announcement came only days after Pyongyang announced through state media that Jang Song Thaek - long considered the country's No. 2 power - had been removed from all his posts because of allegations of corruption, drug use, gambling, womanizing and leading a "dissolute and depraved life." (AP Photo/Wong Maye-E, File)

FOSTER KLUG
Associated Press

PYONGYANG, North Korea (AP) -- North Korea said Friday that it executed Kim Jong Un's uncle as a traitor for trying to seize supreme power, a stunning end for the leader's former mentor, long considered the country's No. 2.

In a sharp reversal of the popular image of Jang Song Thaek as a kindly uncle guiding young leader Kim Jong Un as he consolidated power, the North's official Korean Central News Agency indicated that Jang instead saw the death of Kim's father, Kim Jong Il, in December 2011 as an opportunity to challenge his nephew and win power.

Just days ago, North Korea accused Jang, 67, of corruption, womanizing, gambling and taking drugs, and said he'd been "eliminated" from all his posts. But Friday's allegations, which couldn't be independently confirmed, were linked to a claim that he tried "to overthrow the state by all sorts of intrigues and despicable methods with a wild ambition to grab the supreme power of our party and state."

Pyongyang's statement called him a "traitor to the nation for all ages," ''worse than a dog" and "despicable human scum" who planned a military coup -- rhetoric often reserved in state propaganda for South Korean leaders. State media said Jang was tried for treason by a special military tribunal and executed Thursday.

In the North Korean capital, people crowded around billboards in a subway station displaying the morning paper and news of the execution. North Korea's main newspaper Rodong Sinmun ran a headline on its website that said: "Eternal traitor firmly punished."

A radio broadcast of the news was piped into the subway. People sat quietly and listened as the announcer listed Jang's crimes.

During his two years in power, Kim Jong Un has overseen nuclear and missile tests, other high-profile purges and a barrage of threats this spring, including vows of nuclear strikes against Washington and Seoul. In contrast, his father, Kim Jong Il, took a much lower public profile when he rose to power after the death of his father, Kim Il Sung, in 1994.

It's not clear what Jang's execution and Kim Jong Un's very public approach to leadership say about the future of a country notoriously difficult for outsiders to interpret. Some analysts see the public pillorying of such a senior official, and one related to the leader, as a sign of the young ruler coming into his own and solidifying his grip on power.

"Whatever problems it faced, North Korea has usually acted in a way to bolster its leaders," said Chin Hee-gwan, a professor at South Korea's Inje University. "By showing a little bit of a reign of terror, it's likely that Kim Jong Un's power will be further consolidated."

But others see signs of dangerous instability and an indication that behind the scenes, Kim Jong Un's rise has not been as smooth as previously thought.

"North Korea's announcement is like an acknowledgement that Kim Jong Un's government is still in a transitional period," said Lim Eul Chul, a North Korea expert at South Korea's Kyungnam University.

The execution could be followed by more purges, Lim predicted, but Kim Jong Un will eventually ease up in his approach to domestic affairs because he'll face a bigger crisis if he fails to revive the struggling economy and improve people's living standards.

There are fears in Seoul that the removal of Jang and his followers -- two of his aides were executed last month, South Korea's National Intelligence Service said -- could lead to a miscalculation or even an attack on the South.

Top South Korean presidential security and government ministers held an unscheduled meeting Friday to discuss Jang's execution and its aftermath, according to the presidential Blue House. Seoul's Defense Ministry said the North Korean military has not shown any unusual activities and that there is not any suspicious activity at the North's nuclear test site and missile launch pads.

There are also questions about what the purge means for North Korea's relationship with its only major ally, China. Jang had been seen as the leading supporter of Chinese-style economic reforms and an important link between Pyongyang and Beijing.

Although the high-level purges over the last two years could indicate confidence, Victor Cha, a former senior White House adviser on Asia, said he sees signs of "a lot of churn in the system."

"If he has to go as high as purging and then executing Jang, it tells you that everything's not normal in the system," said Cha, an analyst at the Center for Strategic and International Studies think tank in Washington. "When you take out Jang, you're not taking out just one person -- you're taking out scores if not hundreds of other people in the system. It's got to have some ripple effect."

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