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Feds' loan changes hamper black college enrollment

Tuesday - 2/26/2013, 1:18pm  ET

In this Friday, Feb. 8, 2013 photo, Xavier University student Triton Brown studies in a common area on campus before going to one of his part time jobs in New Orleans. Thousands of students unexpectedly either had to stay at home, transfer to a less expensive school or find new money when the U.S. Department of Education quietly changed how it evaluated the credit of parents applying for a federal PLUS loan. Brown, a Milwaukee native who is a freshman at Xavier University of Louisiana, said his family was counting on a PLUS loan, but his mother's application was rejected after he had been accepted the previous semester. (AP Photo/Gerald Herbert)

BROCK VERGAKIS
Associated Press

ATLANTA (AP) -- Ariadne Partlow dreamed of graduating Spelman College and moving on to medical school, but instead of studying biology this semester, she worked at a fast-food Chinese restaurant.

The Jackson, Tenn., native was among thousands of students who unexpectedly either had to stay at home, transfer to a less expensive school or find new money when the U.S. Department of Education quietly changed how it evaluated the credit of parents applying for a federal PLUS loan.

The greater scrutiny affected families and schools everywhere, but historically black colleges were hit particularly hard because so many of their students come from low-income families dependent on PLUS loans. In recent years, as many as a third of all black college graduates had used PLUS loans, a proportion twice as high as the rate for all schools, according to one estimate.

"All I've known is school, so this is weird not being in school all the time," said Partlow, who would've been a junior this year at historically black Spelman in Atlanta. Partlow attended Spelman last spring with the help of a PLUS loan, but her application for the fall was rejected.

The Education Department said the changes were made as part of an effort to more closely align government lending programs with industry standards and decrease default rates.

Before the changes, the loan program looked at whether an applicant had an adverse credit history for an account in the past 90 days. Now the program looks for delinquent accounts during the last five years. The examination includes foreclosures, bankruptcies, wage garnishments, repossessions and tax liens, in addition to past due payments on bills such as utilities.

While many colleges worried about the denials, others said the changes prevented lower-income families from being saddled with debt they can't afford.

"There are parents getting these loans that really shouldn't be getting these loans. They just don't have the money," said Rachel Fishman, an education policy analyst for the nonpartisan New America Foundation think tank in Washington.

The policy change was made in October 2011, but most students and schools were unaware of it until this past summer when their loans were unexpectedly rejected.

PLUS loans are popular because they don't have a limit and can cover tuition, fees, books as well as room and board and other expenses set by a school.

Triton Brown, a Milwaukee native who is a freshman at Xavier University of Louisiana, said his family was counting on a PLUS loan. His mother's application was rejected after he had been accepted the previous semester.

"I knew that I had to figure something out in a very short period of time," he said.

Brown is working up to 35 hours a week as a busboy and has an on-campus office job to pay off his tuition -- all while taking a full course load.

"Some days I might even miss a few meals or something like that just simply because I either got to go work or I have got to study for class or something. But I figure it'll all be worth it in the long term," he said. "I have the drive. I just won't quit until I do make it to be successful."

The tougher loan standards led to the rejection rate doubling at all schools, according to an estimate done for the Chronicle of Higher Education by Mark Kantrowitz, a leading financial aid expert and the publisher of FinAid.org. Kantrowitz looked at the National Postsecondary Student Aid Study statistics done by the Education Department.

He also crunched the numbers for The Associated Press and found that nationwide, there were 790,600 PLUS loans for students in 2007-2008, with the average for each student at about $10,000. Of those, 30,300 were for students enrolled at an HBCU.

"If they wanted to tighten eligibility for the PLUS loan, this isn't the best way to tighten eligibility. Whether someone had a delinquency five years ago has no bearing on whether they're going to default on the loan now," Kantrowitz said.

The Education Department said it could not provide more recent figures or say how many people were denied PLUS loans after the changes.

Kantrowitz said a better option for determining someone's likelihood of defaulting would include examining debt to income ratios, credit scores and future ability to pay.

In the 2007-2008 school year, about 15 percent of all undergraduate students receiving a degree had a PLUS loan at some point in their college career. Among HBCUs, that figure was 33 percent, according to Kantrowitz.

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