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Iran claims US drone capture; Navy denies loss

Tuesday - 12/4/2012, 8:04pm  ET

In this image taken from the Iranian state TV's Arabic-language channel Al-Alam, showed what they purport to be an intact ScanEagle drone aircraft put on display, as an exclusive broadcast Tuesday Dec. 4, 2012, showing what they say are the first pictures of a captured drone. Iran authorities claimed Tuesday it had captured a U.S. drone after it entered Iranian airspace over the Persian Gulf, and showing an image of a purportedly downed craft on state TV, but the U.S. Navy said all its unmanned aircraft in the region were "fully accounted for."(AP Photo / Al-Alam TV) TV OUT

ALI AKBAR DAREINI
Associated Press

TEHRAN, Iran (AP) -- Iran claimed Tuesday it had taken another prize in a growing showdown with Washington over drone surveillance, displaying a purported U.S. unmanned aircraft it said was captured intact. The U.S. Navy, however, said none of its drones in the region was missing.

The conflicting accounts could put pressure on both sides for more details on U.S. reconnaissance and Iranian counter-measures.

They also point to other questions, including how Iran could manage to snatch the Boeing-designed ScanEagle drone without noticeable damage to its light-weight, carbon-fiber body or whether the aircraft could be from another Gulf country that deploys it.

There is even the possibility the drone is authentic but was plucked from the sea after a past crash and unveiled for maximum effect amid escalating tensions over U.S. reconnaissance missions -- including a Predator drone coming under fire from Iranian warplanes last month.

But unlike the larger Predator, which can carry weapons and sophisticated surveillance systems, the much smaller ScanEagle collects mostly photographic and video images using equipment with little intelligence value, experts said. One called the craft a "large seagull" with cameras.

Monitoring of Gulf air and sea traffic is considered of high importance for the U.S. military. Iran has taken steps to boost its naval and drone capabilities, unsettling Washington's Gulf Arab allies. Iran also has threatened in the past to try to block the strategic Strait of Hormuz -- the route for one-fifth of the world's oil -- in retaliation for Western sanctions over Tehran's nuclear program.

"We had warned American officials not to violate our airspace. We had formally protested such actions and had announced that we protect our borders," state TV quoted Foreign Minister Ali Abkar Salehi as saying.

Washington denies it has crossed into Iranian airspace, but Iran's definition of its jurisdiction could be far broader. State-run Press TV said any surveillance of Iran was considered "a violation of territory."

Asked about Iran's assertion that it had captured a U.S. drone, White House press secretary Jay Carney said "we have no evidence that the Iranian claims are true."

Cmdr. Jason Salata, a spokesman for the U.S. Navy's 5th Fleet in Bahrain, said there are no Navy drones missing in the Middle East.

"The U.S. Navy has fully accounted for all unmanned air vehicles operating in the Middle East region," said Salata. "Our operations in the Gulf are confined to internationally recognized waters and airspace."

He noted that some ScanEagles operated by the Navy "have been lost into the water" over the years, but there is no "record of that occurring most recently."

Other countries in the region, including the United Arab Emirates and Kuwait, also have ScanEagle drones in their fleets. It's used by other militaries, but not among Iran's close allies.

The Iranian announcement did not give details on the time or location of the claimed drone capture.

It's certain, however, to be portrayed by Tehran as another bold challenge to U.S. reconnaissance efforts in the region.

Last month, the Pentagon said a drone came under Iranian fire in the Gulf but was not harmed. A year ago, Iran managed to bring down an unmanned CIA spy drone possibly coming from Afghanistan.

Iran claimed it captured the drone after it entered Iranian airspace. A report on state TV quoted the navy chief of Iran's powerful Revolutionary Guard, Gen. Ali Fadavi, as saying the Iranian forces caught the "intruding" drone.

"The U.S. drone, which was conducting a reconnaissance flight and gathering data over the Persian Gulf in the past few days, was captured by the Guard's navy air defense unit as soon as it entered Iranian airspace," Fadavi said. "Such drones usually take off from large warships."

Al-Alam, the Iranian state TV's Arabic-language channel, showed two Guard commanders examining what appeared to be a ScanEagle drone with no visible damage or military markings on its gray fuselage or wings.

The semiofficial Fars news agency, which is close to the Guard, said it was the captured drone, a propeller-driven craft with a 10-foot (three-meter) wingspan that's sent aloft from a pneumatic launcher from even a small vessel -- undermining Iranian claims that it needs a warship to be deployed.

The drone, built by Boeing subsidiary Insitu Inc., typically would have no high-value intelligence and is used mostly for aerial photographs and video.

"With a ScanEagle, you just throw it off your boat to have a look over the horizon. It's not, like, a major system," said aviation expert Paul E. Eden. "In military chest-beating terms, the U.S. is likely to just laugh at the Iranians for making so much of having captured one."

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