Comment
0
Tweet
0
Print
RSS Feeds

Friendships bubble up at NY Fashion Week

Wednesday - 2/13/2013, 7:03am  ET

Model Petra Nemcova arrives for the showing of the Badgley Mischka Fall 2013 collection during Fashion Week, Tuesday, Feb. 12, 2013, in New York. (AP Photo/Louis Lanzano)

SAMANTHA CRITCHELL
AP Fashion Writer

NEW YORK (AP) -- Rachel Roy was at Vera Wang's NY Fashion Week show Tuesday, in a choice seat next to John Legend. Tory Burch regularly attends the shows of Narciso Rodriguez and Proenza Schouler. Diane von Furstenberg always makes room for Oscar de la Renta, and Tommy Hilfiger took in Belstaff.

Fashion has a reputation for being cutthroat, but there are friendships and mentorships as well that don't always get their due.

"I'm a big believer in supporting others," Burch said in a backstage interview.

Models are part of the glue here, too. Jessica Stam made it to the Chelsea space where Thom Browne was showing and Coco Rocha made a quick change from von Furstenberg's front row to Zac Posen's backstage.

Karlie Kloss was on the red carpet for the Grammy Awards, hosting coverage for MTV. She took an overnight flight from Los Angeles to New York to walk in Carolina Herrera's morning show Monday.

"These are my friends. That's why I got back in time. It's a family reunion at Fashion Week," Kloss said. "It's a common misconception that we don't get along but its not really true. ... To have a long career, you have to get along."

Roy decided to take her show digital this year, which meant an earlier deadline for her looks. She found the newfound freedom had at least one unexpected perk: "I can go to more of my friends' shows!"

John Galliano, who is on a three-week guest stint at de la Renta's studio, did not make a front-of-the-house appearance at the designer's show Tuesday, Day 6 of fall previews that wrap up Feb. 14. Shows follow in London, Milan and Paris.

OSCAR DE LA RENTA

De la Renta did have company on the runway for his bow: models Karlie Kloss and Magdalena Frackowiak. He also had famous fashion designers -- friends Diane von Furstenberg and Valentino -- in the front row.

Nowhere to be seen, however, was John Galliano, who is in the middle of a three-week stint working in de la Renta's studio. The question on guests' minds was if Galliano, fired from Christian Dior two years ago after an anti-Semitic rant was caught on video, would stay at de la Renta's house longer.

They were left to continue the rumor mill, but for the 15 minutes of show, they were fully engrossed in the show.

There seemed distinct segments of the collection: the uptown lady who wears a belted shawl-collar jacket; the artsy jetsetter who wears her black-and-ivory, Toile-print quilted skirt suit with panache; and the young socialite who can rock a shocking-pink ballgown with gold embroidery.

A delicate nude gown with black-bead embroidery likely is headed straight for the red carpet on a top Hollywood star.

BADGLEY MISCHKA

Mark Badgley and James Mischka are big movie buffs, and it shows in their clothes as they always seem attracted to silver-screen femme fatales.

Their fall collection had a film-noir vibe that always does well for them on the modern Hollywood red carpet. This time, the inspiration was Alfred Hitchcock movies -- their favorite being "Vertigo."

Kim Novak as a muse makes so much sense, Badgley said. "She's confident with a little bit of a dark, sexy side."

She also wears polished silhouettes like pencil skirts, fur stoles, halter-top gowns and tops with peplums very well, which fits the Badgley Mischka aesthetic perfectly.

This customer, though, also likes her shine. For fall, she gets a black-and-oyster lame dress, a metallic tweed suit and a jet-black silk and wool gown with a beaded back, cutout bodice and mermaid hemline.

JENNY PACKHAM

All the pretty young things who wear Packham's gowns on the red carpet are about to get a lesson in old-world glamour.

Think farther back than Hollywood's golden age, farther back than Art Deco -- even farther back than the Edwardian era. Packham's fall collection was based on noble 17-century Parisians, the women who would gather in their salons to discuss literature, politics and art.

"These women were educated, wealthy and influential -- they even liked politics. They were like early feminist groups," joked Packham backstage.

It seems they got to do quite a bit of lounging, and that came through in some of Packham's dressing gowns, robe-style silhouettes and powder-colored satins. They also knew how to ramp it up without ever being inappropriate. Packham played with that by showing some body-hugging looks that had high necks and keyhole slashes.

She also put a twist on the beaded gown, covering the whole thing in an extra layer of tulle, which added dimension and a little bit of mystery.

   1 2 3  -  Next page  >>